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Edofnor
VeteranXX
Old
281 - 06-20-2020, 21:08
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he looks like he's trying 2 hard 2 look all manson but instead he's just crosseyed
 
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Brasstax
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Old
282 - 06-21-2020, 05:10
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Here's the Atlanta arsonist


Let's see if she is an RN, a Vet tech or a massage therapist....
 
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Last edited by Brasstax; 06-21-2020 at 05:13..
Brasstax
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Old
283 - 06-21-2020, 05:12
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Here is the massage therapist arson from Philly

I am opening this up to massage therapists too.

I have a hunch that white female nurses, vet techs and massage therapists are taking down America. Karens.
 
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Last edited by Brasstax; 06-21-2020 at 05:16..
ArakAtak
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Old
284 - 06-21-2020, 07:00
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What is a vet tech? Someone who assists a veterinarian or someone who helps ex service people?
 
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Edofnor
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Old
285 - 06-21-2020, 10:17
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basically it's somebody who didn't make it thru the 4 week nurse's assistant program at intellitec
 
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Brasstax
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Old
286 - 06-21-2020, 13:57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArakAtak View Post
What is a vet tech? Someone who assists a veterinarian or someone who helps ex service people?
Here area bunch of them coming down the assembly line


They probably just finished a class in explosives.
 
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Brasstax
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287 - 05-16-2021, 15:03
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Way to go Teddy and Kate

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EoC9PChrgz0

Why is it not weird? Gee - all the cool good people have left or are leaving.
 
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Brasstax
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Old
288 - 05-23-2021, 20:38
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Quote:
The governor sent his tweet soon after the Texas Senate voted 25-5 to pass the bill, which would toughen penalties and calls for jail time for protestors who purposefully block emergency vehicles from passing through a roadway, or obstruct a hospital entrance.
Just saying Portland. Might help with that 20% business vacancy downtown.
 
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Plasmatic
VeteranXV
Old
289 - 05-24-2021, 01:30
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Just under the wire Brassy
 
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Dweasel
Banned
Old
290 - 05-24-2021, 11:58
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Um, I think I'll make me a Taco. Yum yum.
 
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Vanster
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291 - 05-24-2021, 16:37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brasstax View Post
Just saying Portland. Might help with that 20% business vacancy downtown.
lol Portland is almost as expensive to live in as Vancouver.

I'd focus your banjo on the maga cities (now towns) that are actually dying.

 
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JuggerNaught
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292 - 05-24-2021, 16:46
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Yeah Tonto.
Quote:
As the capital, Tallahassee is the site of the Florida State Capitol, Supreme Court of Florida, Florida Governor's Mansion, and nearly 30 state agency headquarters. The city is also known for its large number of law firms, lobbying organizations, trade associations and professional associations, including the Florida Bar and the Florida Chamber of Commerce.It is a recognized regional center for scientific research, and home to the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. In 2015, Tallahassee was awarded the All-American City Award by the National Civic League for the second time.
And has 8 colleges including Florida State, grows by about 1500 people per year

But yea its dying.
 
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Brasstax
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293 - 05-24-2021, 17:02
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The law firms are ready to leave Portland.
It took them to tell the mayor they were leaving to get any action.
Kind of tells you who runs the show.

This is worded to make it sound like Ted had an idea. Nope. The big law firms said "We are moving out of downtown if you don't clean the **** up"

Portland’s Mayor Asks Downtown Law Firms for Help With a Plan to Relocate People Sleeping in Front of Their Offices - Willamette Week

Quote:

Portland’s Mayor Asks Downtown Law Firms for Help With a Plan to Relocate People Sleeping in Front of Their Offices
Sam Adams pitched managing partners last week. Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury offers a scathing review.

DOWN AND OUT: The mayor’s office is enlisting the support of downtown law firms for a plan to move unhoused people to organized campsites. (Sam Gehrke)
By Sophie Peel |
Published May 19 at 5:30 AM Updated May 19 at 5:30 AM

Last week, managing partners from 25 of Portland’s largest law firms assembled on Zoom to air their grievances about downtown homeless camps to Sam Adams. In reply, he made them a remarkable offer.

Adams, the onetime Portland mayor, is now Mayor Ted Wheeler’s czar of homelessness and his liaison to business owners. On May 11, he had a virtual meeting with lawyers, many of whom have offices downtown. In attendance were partners from some of downtown’s biggest firms, including Barran Liebman, Perkins Coie, Schwabe Williamson, and Davis Wright Tremaine, all of which lease thousands of square feet of prime downtown real estate.

WW spoke to multiple people who attended the meeting. One moment stood out to everyone WW spoke with: Adams described the mayor’s plan to create safe camping sites for unhoused people in Portland neighborhoods. And he pledged the city would move homeless campers from downtown sidewalks into these new campsites.

Adams tells WW the mayor and City Commissioner Dan Ryan are currently working on a plan to erect safe camping spots all across the city and “understand the urgency of it.”

That plan has not been widely broadcast by the mayor’s office. (It’s not listed on the mayor’s website among his plans for restoring downtown.) For good reason: Adams went on to point out that the proposal is not going to be popular with homeowners in the neighborhoods where those sites would open. He told the law partners the mayor would need the vocal backing of their firms and other businesses.

Adams’ pitch and the meeting where it occurred display the pressures his boss currently faces. In the same discussion, law partners gave Adams a message to take to Wheeler: Within weeks, their employees will be allowed return to downtown law offices after more than a year of remote work. If the mayor doesn’t start getting tents off the sidewalks by the time employees come back, the firms may well leave downtown as their leases expire.

“They were frustrated and angry,” Adams recalls. “They all said: ‘We’re Portlanders, we love this city, we’re compassionate, we’re humane, but unless some order is brought to this disorder, we’ll be looking to change where we’re officed.’ They were very clear.”

A number of those in attendance recounted the conversation to WW, and the picture that emerges is one that Wheeler and Adams are hearing increasingly: Portland is days away from receiving the state’s sanction for its office towers to reopen. But many of the employees who fill those buildings are reluctant to return.

“He gave a lot of examples of things that are being done—there’s no shortage of things—but what’s the pace?” asks Andrew Schpak, a managing partner at Barran Liebman who attended the meeting. “I think it’s fair to say that some of the law firms are frustrated about the state of downtown and don’t necessarily feel like there’s a clear path forward.”

Wheeler may face a recall election this fall. The desire to unseat him is expressed most passionately by leftists angered by how he has handled policing and larger social justice issues. But Wheeler’s base is business interests, including those downtown law firms. If they don’t rally behind Wheeler, the mayor could be toast.

The frustration may also prove a pivotal moment for the vision of Portland’s downtown as its most important neighborhood. Since the 1970s, what made Portland unique was the idea that its downtown was a gathering place where all citizens could meet—to work, shop and play.

Now it’s a place that white-shoe lawyers are hesitant to set foot in.

What would be the result of their firms uprooting?

“Devastating,” Adams says. “Normally, downtown has upwards of 140,000 office workers, and the bulk of those are missing. To see that scatter outside downtown, you lose that critical economic mass that is absolutely essential to every great city.”

Adams tells WW the mayor and Commissioner Ryan are working on plans to erect safe camping sites in every part of the city, including downtown.

While Adams declined to say when those sites would be ready for use, he says they’re currently figuring out costs and thinking about potential locations.

The idea of the sites: sanctioned lots where people can park their tents and have access to sanitary facilities.

While his plan was met with support at the meeting, Adams went on to say the proposal will be controversial and need the outspoken approval of the law firms.

That’s partly because in the past, such sites have led to harsh backlash from neighbors adjacent to the sites.

It’s also because camping spaces are not a priority in Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury’s proposed budget.

Metro voters approved a tax measure last year for homeless services—$53 million of which is allocated to Multnomah County, and which Kafoury proposes to spend mostly on permanent housing rather than temporary shelters.

That’s because voters approved the measure believing it would mostly go toward permanent housing, not short-term housing or shelter beds, says Denis Theriault, a spokesman for the Joint Office of Homeless Services.

“There’s an unfortunate myth out there about the kind of work voters wanted the Metro measure to fund,” Theriault says. “Housing people not only ends their homelessness, but that work can be done in just as much time, and sometimes less, than building shelters.”

In an email to WW, Kafoury calls the mayor’s plan a “back-of-the-napkin sales pitch” and says “they are afraid of being held to account and getting asked some tough but necessary questions [like], will people be forced by police to go to these camps or any other shelter settings they might be looking to create? Which neighborhoods have they identified for these camps? How will people be cared for and kept safe in these camps?”

Furthermore, Kafoury adds: “I’d also like to dispel a dangerous myth that some people, including the mayor and others, are spreading right now: that [temporary] shelter is faster, cheaper and that it solves homelessness. This is a demonstrable falsehood. It isn’t faster. It isn’t cheaper [than permanent housing]. And most importantly, it doesn’t help people end their homelessness. [The mayor] should know that a housing voucher is something that pays someone’s rent and can be immediate. It doesn’t take years. And yet, he is promoting this myth as a political tool, which is cynical and dangerous.”

Kafoury says the county will use most of its ARPA funds to manage the pandemic.

While those who attended the lawyers’ meeting say Adams did not offer any criticism of Kafoury, he told WW in an interview this week that Wheeler is no longer content to wait on Kafoury to share his priorities and says the city has its own funds from the American Rescue Plan—$108 million this spring and another $108 million later this year—that could be partly used to fund safe camping sites.

Adams says Wheeler will dip into it if Kafoury won’t budge.

“We think it should be something that both governments should participate in through the joint office,” Adams says. “We’re not giving up on any potential funding source at this point, but the mayor and Ryan are very focused on making these improvements.”

Adams’ meeting last week makes clear that downtown tenants have run out of patience. So have their landlords.

Vanessa Sturgeon, president and CEO of TMT Development—which owns Fox Tower, among other downtown properties—says she speaks regularly with Adams on the question of downtown camping.

She places the blame on Kafoury and other county officials. Sturgeon says Wheeler “doesn’t have the same sort of influence on that particular issue that people think he does. It’s the county’s responsibility.”

However, Wheeler is in an unusually vulnerable position. In July, his critics on the left will begin gathering signatures to recall him. None of those adversaries wants homeless camps swept.

But Wheeler’s reelection was backed by business interests that wrote checks to fund his narrow victory. Since November, he has done little to mollify them. If he can’t make headway on removing tents from in front of their buildings, they will likely remain neutral while Wheeler’s political fate hangs in the balance.

That’s the subtext of every threat to leave downtown.

In a neat symmetry, the next three months are also the period when big law firms will judge whether downtown has changed enough that their workers feel comfortable returning to the office.

“There’s a lot of drug dealing and open drug use on the street, and that freaks people out,” Sturgeon says. “People need to see some action in order to feel confident renewing their leases. It needs to happen by September, when most people plan to have business come back to work. It needs to be the focus of the summer.”
 
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LawnDart
VeteranXV
Old
294 - 05-24-2021, 17:09
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanster View Post
lol Portland is almost as expensive to live in as Vancouver.

I'd focus your banjo on the maga cities (now towns) that are actually dying.
[/IMG]
maybe you should focus on being a snitch ya little *****
 
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Brasstax
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Old
295 - 05-25-2021, 19:25
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Quote:
Homeless individuals file class action suit over city of Portland losing their possessions amid encampment razing
Updated May 24, 9:26 PM; Posted May 24, 2:31 PM
Laurelhurst homeless encampment

Workers clean at a homeless encampment at Laurelhurst Park in November 2020. Beth Nakamura / The Oregonian
By Nicole Hayden | The Oregonian/OregonLive

Four individuals experiencing homelessness filed a class-action lawsuit against the city of Portland Monday, alleging its contractors, including Rapid Response, have illegally discarded their personal items when razing encampments.

When kicking people out of an encampment, workers are required under a court ruling to collect and store property that people can***8217;t immediately carry away, providing individuals 30 days to collect their items.

The lawsuit, first reported by OPB, said the city has repeatedly failed to do so. The plaintiffs said contractors don***8217;t document or catalog the items they confiscate, providing no reliable way to guarantee property can be claimed. Itemized receipts are not given to individuals as proof of their possessions. The individuals argued this has often led to lost items, causing people to have to buy new tents, clothes and other provisions needed to survive.

***8220;When a tent is all you own, (these actions) are aggravating and depressing,***8221; Steven Black, one of the plaintiffs, told The Oregonian/OregonLive. ***8220;Even though a tent really isn***8217;t a home, it is the best you have at the time because sleeping in a doorway really sucks.***8221; Black said he has gone weeks without a tent following multiple encampment evictions.

The lawsuit comes days after the city announced rule changes for how they remove encampments. City officials and contractors will continue to give individuals 48 hours***8217; notice before an eviction. However, the protocol change will eliminate the 24-hour compliance notice that typically would have come before the eviction notice. This means campers will have two days to pack up their belongings and move elsewhere before the city returns to remove any remaining items. Additionally, the outreach team is no longer required to work with individuals at high-impact campsites before posting an eviction notice.

***8220;The city does not deny that its contractors systemically ignored the requirements of (the law) ***8230; nor has the city confirmed that it has adopted adequate policies and procedures to stop its contractors from continually to systemically ignore the requirements of (the law) moving forward,***8221; attorneys argued in the lawsuit.

Mark Alejos, communications specialist for the city of Portland, said the city does not comment on pending litigation.

The plaintiffs did not ask for money but asked the city enforce its own policies to assure that people are able to fairly retain their possessions. Michael Fuller, Kelly Donovan Jones and lawyers from Oregon Justice Resource Center Juan Chavez and Franz Bruggemeier are representing the individuals for free.

WAKE UP AND GET OUT

While contractors must give people at least 48 hours***8217; notice of eviction, Rapid Response does not inform residents which day it will be back to demolish the encampment. Instead, contractors show up and inform people that they must move all their belongings in 15 to 30 minutes, according to the lawsuit.

In one instance, Rapid Response and Portland Police officers arrived at 7 a.m. and began yelling at each tent to ***8220;wake up and get out,***8221; it said. In other instances, plaintiffs reported workers kicked their possessions into garbage bags.

The plaintiffs report that personal property from multiple campers is thrown together into clear garbage bags and labeled with the date and the location of the encampment. Organization and cataloguing does not extend beyond that, the lawsuit said.

***8220;(Rapid Response workers) are friendly when they come pick up garbage on regular days but I just think their sweeps procedures need to be tightened up big time so people can get their stuff,***8221; Black said. ***8220;I just wish they would do what they are supposed to do and photograph and itemize everything.***8221;

Workers drop off the bags in a warehouse with towering shelves. People who want to reclaim their items must come and dig through the bags, the lawsuit said.

Street campers report they have lost tents, sleeping bags, blankets, tools, clothes, boots, household goods, bicycles, hygiene items, computers, work gear, tarps and wagons.

Scott Rupp, a plaintiff in the case, asked a police officer during one camp removal for a property receipt so that he could claim the items that were his at the warehouse but says he was ignored. He was worried that some of the items that were most important to him would get lost among the piles.

***8220;They ***8230; took an irreplaceable and sentimental ring that (Rupp***8217;s) late wife had given him,***8221; the lawsuit alleged. ***8220;It was in one of the tents, in a box by his bed. He watched them bag everything up and toss it into the back of the truck.***8221;

Black, one of the plaintiffs, reported that he was not able to find his property at the warehouse. He described his items to a warehouse worker and was told that someone had already taken those belongings. To prevent the city from taking more of his possessions, Black said he chose to sleep in doorways of businesses since he was afraid if he popped his tent up, he would be swept again. This meant he was further exposed to poor weather and COVID-19, the lawsuit said.

Another issue for many individuals is that they don***8217;t have access to transportation to get to the warehouse or a way to carry the items to their new camping spot. The lawsuit notes that Rapid Response has told individuals that it will deliver items anywhere if not to the same spot where people were kicked out. However, that hasn***8217;t been the case in practice, the lawsuit said.

***8220;(Rupp) called Rapid Response and asked them if they could deliver his belongings to him. ***8230; They told him that they were too busy to do that,***8221; the lawsuit said.

The lawsuit also unveiled allegations that city contractors confiscated property such as computers or work supplies, inhibiting people from either looking for work or showing up to their job prepared and police officers often were rude or aggressive during their interactions with homeless individuals, it said.

***8220;Rapid Response people don***8217;t do their job like they are supposed to but they are pretty neutral in how they treat you,***8221; Black said. ***8220;It***8217;s the cops that act like schoolyard bullies. They just try to intimidate you.***8221;

Rapid Response workers also confiscated cold-weather gear during some of the coldest months. Jennifer Bryant, another plaintiff, reported that Rapid Response destroyed her tent during a sweep, days before a severe winter storm in February. She has experienced four encampment removals in six months.

But Black believes that Rapid Response does have the ability to handle people***8217;s property fairly.

***8220;There***8217;s a guy who lives near me that every time he has to go to the hospital, he calls Rapid Response and they immediately come and personally pack up his stuff for him so that it is safe while he***8217;s in the hospital,***8221; Black said. ***8220;So they do some good. But the sweeps are bad.***8221;
Homeless individuals file class action suit over city of Portland losing their possessions amid encampment razing - oregonlive.com
 
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Data
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Old
296 - 05-25-2021, 20:51
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Originally Posted by JuggerNaught View Post
Yeah Tonto.


And has 8 colleges including Florida State, grows by about 1500 people per year

But yea its dying.
Everything Vanster dislikes is "dying".

Just like this site. He hates it and it's "dying" but he'll never leave.

He's a walking (running?) contradiction.
 
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Vanster
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Old
297 - 05-25-2021, 20:57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Data View Post
Everything Vanster dislikes is "dying".

Just like this site. He hates it and it's "dying" but he'll never leave.

He's a walking (running?) contradiction.
I want to watch it die. Every time the account gets suspended I get false hope, and then whatever rednecks pool their money and pay the bill.

I don't think TW has paid for itself in more than a year.

Edit: Racism isn't dying. Rednecks are flourishing. C-Lo Greene and Pauly Shore are still able to find work. There are lots of things I hate that just refuse to die.
 
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Last edited by Vanster; 05-25-2021 at 20:59..
Edofnor
VeteranXX
Old
298 - 05-25-2021, 22:03
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vanster, r u 1 of the things u h8 that just refuses 2 dide? is that y as a frail old boomber u ultramarathon like a suicidal chinaman in the illegally occupied western provinces?
 
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Edofnor
VeteranXX
Old
299 - 05-25-2021, 22:04
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axing 4 a fren
 
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Edofnor
VeteranXX
Old
300 - 05-25-2021, 22:05
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just 4 the data tape
 
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