Life span vs. age at retirement by Mr Jimmy Pop - TribalWar Forums
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Mr Jimmy Pop
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1 - 05-29-2012, 22:14
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Age at Retirement / Average Age at death

49.9 86

51.2 85.3

52.5 84.6

53.8 83.9

55.1 83.2

56.4 82.5

57.2 81.4

58.3 80

59.2 78.5

60.1 76.8

61.0 74.5

62.1 71.8

63.1 69.3

64.1 67.9

65.2 66.8



Ephrem:
 
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Last edited by Mr Jimmy Pop; 05-29-2012 at 22:17..
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vawlk
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2 - 05-29-2012, 22:19
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i get to retire with full pension at 55. Woo!
 
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WarBuddha
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3 - 05-29-2012, 22:20
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I'll be 43. Go Navy.
 
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Mr Jimmy Pop
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4 - 05-29-2012, 22:22
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i am planning on 56, that is when i can collect from my military pension. thanks george bush


though my dad is still working at 76
 
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krustyy
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5 - 05-29-2012, 22:23
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Doesn't surprise me at all, but I don't think it's work that kills you. I bet if you made a similar chart with average yearly income for the 20 years before retirement, you'd see a similar graph.

I think the people who retire later are more in need of the money because they're mishandling their money or otherwise aren't making enough money. Because of this, their diet, exercise, and healthcare suffers.
 
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Calx
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6 - 05-29-2012, 22:24
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make sure you retire with enough to last you
 
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WarBuddha
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7 - 05-29-2012, 22:31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krustyy View Post
Doesn't surprise me at all, but I don't think it's work that kills you. I bet if you made a similar chart with average yearly income for the 20 years before retirement, you'd see a similar graph.

I think the people who retire later are more in need of the money because they're mishandling their money or otherwise aren't making enough money. Because of this, their diet, exercise, and healthcare suffers.
Ya I would say this just shows that poor people work longer because they make less money and die younger because they're unhealthy, nothing really odd about that.

Then again my Mom is in super terrific health and is still working at 63.
 
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Milk-Man
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8 - 05-29-2012, 22:33
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I'm already retired

I think I may have done it too soon though cuz now I have less than a years worth of money to live on.

Maybe I'll go the American Beauty route and work a drive-thru
 
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Scud411
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9 - 05-29-2012, 22:34
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some people don't know really how to stop working.

when you've been working for 40 years it's hard to just STOP.

my dad was working (as best he could) at 62 and died at 62 (cancer).
 
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Milk-Man
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10 - 05-29-2012, 22:49
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Jobs can be stressful, but I think recent retirees find being alone with themselves far more stressful. All their lives spent with activities constantly filling their days for years and years, never really taking time for themselves. I imagine how it could be quite a shock.

We believe in a personal, unique, and separate identity ***8212; but if we dare to examine it, we find that this identity depends entirely on an endless collection of things to prop it up: our name, our ***8220;biography,***8221; our partners, family, home, job, friends, credit cards. . . . It is on their fragile and transient support that we rely for our security. So when they are all taken away, will we have any idea of who we really are? Without our familiar props, we are faced with just ourselves, a person we do not know, an unnerving stranger with whom we have been living all the time but we never really wanted to meet. Isn***8217;t that why we have tried to fill every moment of time with noise and activity, however boring or trivial, to ensure that we are never left in silence with this stranger on our own?

-Sogyal Rinpoche
 
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WarBuddha
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11 - 05-29-2012, 22:51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milk-Man View Post
We believe in a personal, unique, and separate identity — but if we dare to examine it, we find that this identity depends entirely on an endless collection of things to prop it up: our name, our “biography,” our partners, family, home, job, friends, credit cards. . . . It is on their fragile and transient support that we rely for our security. So when they are all taken away, will we have any idea of who we really are? Without our familiar props, we are faced with just ourselves, a person we do not know, an unnerving stranger with whom we have been living all the time but we never really wanted to meet. Isn’t that why we have tried to fill every moment of time with noise and activity, however boring or trivial, to ensure that we are never left in silence with this stranger on our own?

-Sogyal Rinpoche
I honestly just had an experience like this for about 4 months. It was....interesting. Lets just say when you are alone with your thoughts and little else for an extended period of time it's enlightening, and very dark.
 
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Milk-Man
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12 - 05-29-2012, 22:56
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I think it's a journey everyone should take before they're done with their teens, and one that should be revisited again and again.
 
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Mr Jimmy Pop
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13 - 05-29-2012, 22:59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sogyal Rinpoche View Post
Isn’t that why we have tried to fill every moment of time with noise and activity, however boring or trivial, to ensure that we are never left in silence with this stranger on our own?

stfu member
 
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naptown
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14 - 05-29-2012, 23:01
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spend your retirement

you cant take your money with you when you die

morons
 
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Velocity
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15 - 05-29-2012, 23:06
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This "study" is almost 10 years old and has been debunked.

Quote:
Ephrem Cheng built this analysis on the basis of data he got second hand from Boeings actuarial department, and it was "supported" by anecdotal information from other people.

It is initially suspicious because of the linearity of the data itself.

On further review and when Ephrem was challenged, he recontacted his actuarial friends at Boeing who acknowledged that the data had been "floating around" for more than 20 years and nobody knew where it had actually originated.

A current study done at Sandia labs in 2001 indicated that regardless of the retiree date, age at death spanned a 30 year period. The correlation between retirement age and longevity was only .37, extremely low.

On recontacting Boeing with this new Sandia data, Boeing acknowledged that the new data was consistent with current data they were using.

The determination from this is that the original Boeing data was a hoax or simply a bad conclusion drawn from bad, aged or mixed data.

Further summarization from the re-analysis:

"In statistical analyses, the analyzers are often under substantial pressure to get a reasonably large sample size to yield stable statistics. For example, the Sandia retiree study covers the 50-year period from November 1951 to May 2001 and involves about three different generations of people assuming 20 years for each generation. Some of those people who retired in the early 1950s in the Sandia retiree study may be born in the 19th century. Therefore, such statistical study of retirees mixes populations not only from different generations, but also from different centuries with very different average life spans. We shall call such retirees life span statistics as a ***8220;composite***8221; life span statistics in view of the time dependence of life span.

Since the retirees who retired in early 1950s may have an average life span shorter than those retired in late 1990s, 2000 and 2001 by about 21 years, such mixture of three generations of retirees in the statistical analysis may increase the range of scattering of data from their average values by about 21 years and contribute to the obscuring of the possible either positive or negative effect of age of retirement on life span if there is any effect at all. It may also contribute to the low correlation coefficient of 0.37 between age of retirement and the life span in the Sandia data.

One of my classmates reminds me that the large-scale epidemiological studies indicate that the workers tend to be healthier and tend to live longer than the non-workers, on average, and is know as the Healthy Worker Syndrome (HWS).

Similarly, the composite old Boeing retiree data may also contain retirees who may also be born in the 19th century with an average life span much shorter than that of our current generation of working people in the 21st century.
and

Retiring early means a longer life ***8211; an urban myth? :: squareCircleZ
 
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Fool
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16 - 05-29-2012, 23:11
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Um this is not shocking at all. People who can afford to retire early can also afford better health coverage. People don't often choose to work into their twilight years, they do so out of necessity.
 
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Stone Cold Steve Autism
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17 - 05-29-2012, 23:25
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Retirement, lol. It's a ****ing joke.
 
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Mr Jimmy Pop
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18 - 05-30-2012, 00:01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
This "study" is almost 10 years old and has been debunked.



and

Retiring early means a longer life – an urban myth? :: squareCircleZ
Damn, thread buzzkill


/thread
 
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lemon
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19 - 05-30-2012, 00:12
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another bull**** thread by tkk

gg
 
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FiEND
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20 - 05-30-2012, 06:07
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they recently raised the retirement age in Canada to 67.. according to that chart, no one will make it.
 
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