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Authorities say SD driver of stolen van's blood alcohol content was .708, a possible

Submitted by: TooSmoothe @ 11:15 AM | Thursday, December 31, 2009 | (url: http://www.startr...)



RAPID CITY, S.D. - South Dakota authorities say a woman found passed out in a stolen delivery van earlier this month registered a blood alcohol content of .708 nearly nine times the legal limit and a possible record for the state.

Meade County State's Attorney Jesse Sondreal said Wednesday that 45-year-old Marguerite Engle, who recently moved from Minnesota, was found slumped over the van's steering wheel along a highway on Dec. 1.

He says the highest blood alcohol content state chemists he spoke with could recall was a .56. The state's legal limit is .08.

Authorities say Engle missed an initial court hearing Dec. 15, but that they found her Monday in another stolen vehicle, and that she had been drinking.

She was being held on two counts of driving under the influence. It wasn't immediately clear if she was facing other charges.

Her attorney declined comment.


X-Box 360 theft suspect busted after online gaming sesh

Submitted by: nSpectre @ 01:56 PM | Wednesday, December 30, 2009 | (url: http://www.thereg...)

From tagged to fragged

By John Leyden

Posted in Crime, 30th December 2009 11:48 GMT

An alleged X-Box 360 thief was tracked down after he forgot to disable the game console's auto sign-in feature before hopping on the net.

Jeremy Gilliam, 22, from the Bronx in New York City, was arrested after the victim of a theft noticed a gametag he had set up in a recently stolen console had appeared online. The victim told his parents who, in turn, notified the police.

Microsoft assisted in a subsequent investigation that led back to the internet connection for the house of Gilliam's grandmother. Police obtained a warrant and searched the premises where they found stolen games, laptops, and satnavs. Gilliam, who already faces car theft charges, was subsequently charged with burglary offences.

More on the story can be found in an article by the New York Post here and posts on gaming blogs.

Category: Console Gaming | 7 Comments
Tags: pwned

Tehran, Police run over protester

Submitted by: Kallama @ 05:37 PM | Tuesday, December 29, 2009 | (url: http://www.irepor...)

The Iranian government is covering up a lot of news in and outside Iran, that they don't kill, they don't torture...how do you answer to this...

Khamenehei I wish you a long life full of suffering I wish you the worst possible nightmares, I wish you to be judged in front of the world for your crime along with your mafia dogs and get punished by world for your crimes.



The hell you discribe would be your home soon, rest assured there is no life after this for you there will be only hell for ever.



Please show this video on CNN (as you may see it fit) to show the world how this dictatorship is treating our brothers and sisters in Iran....please


How Success Killed Duke Nukem

Submitted by: KnightMare @ 11:00 AM | Tuesday, December 22, 2009 | (url: http://www.wired....)

On the last day, they gathered for a group photo. They were videogame programmers, artists, level builders, artificial-intelligence experts. Their team was finally giving up, declaring defeat, and disbanding. So they headed down to the lobby of their building in Garland, Texas, to smile for the camera. They arranged themselves on top of their logo: a 10-foot-wide nuclear-radiation sign, inlaid in the marble floor.

To videogame fans, that logo is instantly recognizable. Its the insignia of Duke Nukem 3D, a computer game that revolutionized shoot-em-up virtual violence in 1996. Featuring a swaggering, steroidal, wisecracking hero, Duke Nukem 3D became one of the top-selling videogames ever, making its creators very wealthy and leaving fans absolutely delirious for a sequel. The team quickly began work on that sequel, Duke Nukem Forever, and it became one of the most hotly anticipated games of all time.

It was never completed. Screenshots and video snippets would leak out every few years, each time whipping fans into a lather and each time, the game would recede from view. Normally, videogames take two to four years to build; five years is considered worryingly long. But the Duke Nukem Forever team worked for 12 years straight. As one patient fan pointed out, when development on Duke Nukem Forever started, most computers were still using Windows 95, Pixar had made only one movie Toy Story and Xbox did not yet exist.

On May 6, 2009, everything ended. Drained of funds after so many years of work, the games developer, 3D Realms, told its employees to collect their stuff and put it in boxes. The next week, the company was sued for millions by its publisher for failing to finish the sequel.


Half-Life 2 Mod: Orion Release Date Announced

Submitted by: OtakuMark @ 04:18 PM | Sunday, December 6, 2009 | (url: http://planethalf...)


Orion, a Half-Life 2 modification, is within its final stages of testing and will be in "closed" beta starting December 4th. This beta will be open to anyone with a FilePlanet account, subscriber or not, and will run until December 11th, when it will be released to everybody else.

Gameplay video: www.orion-project.net/index.php?page=media&view=1

Screenshot: www.orion-project.net/media/orion09.jpg
Screenshot: www.orion-project.net/media/orion15.jpg
Screenshot: www.orion-project.net/media/orion11.jpg
Screenshot: www.orion-project.net/media/orion12.jpg
Screenshot: www.orion-project.net/media/orion13.jpg
Screenshot: www.orion-project.net/media/ctf_strike.jpg


Battlefied: Heroes basically goes pay to play

Submitted by: KnightMare @ 09:26 AM | Wednesday, December 2, 2009 | (url: http://arstechnic...)

EA and DICE began a grand experiment in North America with Battlefield: Heroes, a free-to-play, casual shooter that would allow anyone to download the client and play for free. You could buy certain items to give yourself an edge, sure, but it was just as easy to earn in-game Valor Points (VP) to purchase weapons and widgets for use in the game. Many gamers did just this, earning VP in their regular gaming session without ever paying a dime. Others made a few purchases here and there to round out their items.

It seems gamers simply weren't spending enough money, though, as a recent price restructuring destroys the ability to play without spending real money. The cost of all items in terms of the free VP has been increased substantially, while the cost of items in "BattleFunds," which you buy with real money, has been decreased. In other words, it's now impossible to earn or keep decent equipment simply by playing; you're going to need to get out the checkbook to stay competitive on the servers.

One gamer worked out the math to figure out how much he would now have to play to earn a single super weapon. "So, 450 VP a day... at a maximum of 7 VP a game, that's 50 games a day. About 4 hours worth of playing," he explained. "Now, when you lose a round you can only get 5 VP, making the amount of rounds you need to play each day to keep ONE weapon about 60, which is about 5 hours playtime, every day, for one Uber/Super weapon." That may seem dense with in-game jargon, but the point is clear: no one but the most hardcore players will be able to use high-end weapons without paying for them.


Department of Defense Buys 2,2000 PS3s

Submitted by: XTasy @ 01:05 AM | Monday, November 30, 2009 | (url: http://gizmodo.co...)

Apparently the Department of Defense believes that PS3s are a better value when it comes to supercomputers than IBM products specifically designed for the purpose. Granted recent price drops probably didn't hurt in justifying a 2,200 console order either.

This isn't the first time that the DoD is using PS3 consoles for supercomputing. In fact, these 2,200 units are going to be added to an existing Linux cluster of 336 PS3s used by the United States Air Force. According to Justification Review Documents, the purchase is all about getting the best value out the DoD's budget:

With respect to cell processors, a single 1U server configured with two 3.2GHz cell processors can cost up to $8K while two Sony PS3s cost approximately $600. Though a single 3.2 GHz cell processor can deliver over 200 GFLOPS, whereas the Sony PS3 configuration delivers approximately 150 GFLOPS, the approximately tenfold cost difference per GFLOP makes the Sony PS3 the only viable technology for HPC applications.

I'm all for balancing cost and features, but isn't it just a bit curious that someone thought to save on upgrading the supercomputer just after Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 was released?


Microsoft Offers To Pay News Publishers To Pull Content From Google

Submitted by: 9Millimeter @ 12:03 PM | Tuesday, November 24, 2009 | (url: http://paidconten...)

The next battle in the search wars could be over access to news content. The FT reports that Microsoft (NSDQ: MSFT)which has made increasing the market share of its Bing search engine its top online priorityhas reached out to big online publishers in order to get them to pull their sites from Google (NSDQ: GOOG). Among the parties currently in discussions with Microsoft is News Corp. (NYSE: NWS), which has very loudly threatened to block search engines from crawling the content of its newspapers.

Unclear how far along these discussions are, although TechCrunch also reported a week ago that Microsoft had a meeting with representatives from top British papers, including the Financial Times, about giving their content premium positions on Bing.

This report seems to take that a step further since not only would Microsoft presumably be giving the content of its partners better play, it would also be paying to ensure that their content could not be found directly via the search engine of its arch-rival.

That would give Bing bragging rights to something Google does not have. Its other attempts at doing so havent been as successful. For instance, after it announced a deal with Twitter to feature Tweets from the microblog in real-time, Google followed up with its own agreement hours later.

For the newspapers, of course, the question is whether Microsofts dollars can make up for the loss of traffic that Google generates for them.

Online publishers would likely demand top dollar. Asked about the possibility last week, News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch said he wasnt convinced even Microsoft could afford it: If they were to pay everybody for everything they took, from every newspaper in the world and every magazine they wouldnt have any profits left.

Category: Technology | 11 Comments
Tags: bing

US Air Force Buying 2200 PlayStation 3s

Submitted by: 9Millimeter @ 11:27 AM | Monday, November 23, 2009 | (url: http://www.n4g.co...)

The U.S. Air Force is looking to buy 2,200 Sony PlayStation 3 game
consoles to built out a research supercomputer, according to an document posted on the federal government's procurement Web site.
The PlayStation 3s will be used at the Air Force Research Laboratory's information directorate in Rome, N.Y., where they will be added to an existing cluster of 336 PlayStation 3s being used to conduct supercomputing research.


Sales of PC Gaming Hardware Predicted to Hit $27B in 2010

Submitted by: 9Millimeter @ 10:22 AM | Saturday, November 21, 2009 | (url: http://www.i4u.co...)

JPR has released a new report that predicts sales of PC gaming hardware will reach $27 billion in 2010. The global PC hardware gaming market is expected to grow by $1.2 billion this year, a 5.9% increase from 2008.

The increase is due to an increased demand for enthusiast, performance, and mainstream hardware influenced by the desire to play games on the PC. The PC gaming market is set to grow by 30% in 2010 due in part to delays in buying systems in 2008/2009 as users waited for the economy to improve.

This means that any of you console gamers out there who like to think PC gaming is dead need to think again. The market is growing impressively despite the poor economy and top tier games are still coming to the platform.

www.i4u.com/article28511.html

Category: Hardware | 14 Comments
Tags: games hardware

Bing Captures Almost 10 Percent Search Share In U.S.

Submitted by: KnightMare @ 09:10 AM | Tuesday, November 17, 2009 | (url: http://www.techcr...)

Remember all that talk about Bing starting to fizzle in September? Well it didnt happen, and now October numbers and Bing gained another half a point to reach 9.9 percent market share of U.S. searches, according to comScores qSearch service. Five months after launch, Bing has steadily gained two points of market share.

And it is keeping the pressure on, with deals to index realtime data streams from both Twitter and Facebook (Google also has a deal with Twitter, but not Facebook), a deal with Wolfram Alpha for nutrition and diet data, and the constant rollout of new features such as better video search.

The biggest loser in the search wars, however, continues to be Yahoo as it awaits approval to hand over search to Bing. In a single month, Yahoos U.S. search share dropped 0.8 percent to 18 percent, and is down 3 percent since the beginning of the year. Meanwhile, Google seems unfazed, gaining another half point itself in October to finish with 65.4 percent share.

Bings progress is encouraging (someone needs to compete with Google in search), but so far all Bing has shown is that it can take share away from its future partner Yahoo. Bing has yet to put a ding in Googles share. Perhaps it needs to do something radical, like cut deals with major news and media sites for exclusive rights to index their content. Otherwise it will just keep eating away at Yahoos slice of pie, which its already been promised anyway.


Intel to Pay AMD 1.25 Billion Dollars

Submitted by: KnightMare @ 08:54 AM | Thursday, November 12, 2009 | (url: http://www.pcmag....)

Advanced Micro Devices and Intel have agreed to settle their outstanding litigation, and Intel will pay AMD $1.25 billion as a result, the two companies said Thursday.

The settlement ends all litigation between the two companies, including a Delaware case and two cases in Japan. The U.S. case was scheduled to go to trial in 2010.

"While the relationship between the two companies has been difficult in the past, this agreement ends the legal disputes and enables the companies to focus all of our efforts on product innovation and development," the two companies said in a statement.

AMD executives had declined to comment at an AMD analyst day on Thursday about the possibility of a settlement.

Under the terms of the agreement, AMD and Intel obtain patent rights from a new 5-year cross license agreement, Intel and AMD will give up any claims of breach from the previous license agreement, and Intel will pay AMD $1.25 billion. Intel has also agreed to abide by a set of business practice provisions, the companies said.


Microsoft: Windows 7 sales exceed Vista sales by 234%

Submitted by: KnightMare @ 07:36 PM | Thursday, November 5, 2009 | (url: http://windowstea...)

It has been quite amazing to watch the global excitement build around Windows 7, especially during a tough economic climate. It was just a few short weeks ago that we learned about Windows 7 outselling the UK's "own" Harry Potter. In Japan, anxious PC users waited in line to be one of the first to get their hands on Windows 7. And just today, according to the NPD groups' weekly tracking service, Windows 7 software unit sales in the U.S. increased 234% over Windows Vista's first few days of sales. "A combination of factors impacted Windows 7 PC sales at the outset, but the trajectory of overall PC sales is very strong leading into the holiday season," said Stephen Baker at NPD.


Gratuitous Space Battles Released

Submitted by: KnightMare @ 11:14 AM | Wednesday, November 4, 2009 | (url: http://gratuitous...)


Demo: http://positech.co.uk/gratuitousspacebattles/demo.html

GSB is the new game from UK developer 'Positech Games'. It's a strategy / management / simulation game that does away with all the base building and delays and gets straight to the meat and potatoes of science-fiction games : The big space battles fought by huge spaceships with tons of laser beams and things going 'zap!', 'ka-boom!' and 'ka-pow!'. In GSB you put your ships together from modular components, arrange them into fleets, give your ships orders of engagement and then hope they emerge victorious from battle (or at least blow to bits in aesthetically pleasing ways).

Gratuitous Space Battles aims to bring the over-the-top explodiness back into space games. The game is for everyone who has watched big space armadas battle it out on TV and thought to themselves 'I could have done a much better job as admiral'. This is not a game of real-time arcade twitch reflexes. GSB is about what ships you design, and what you tell them to do. Your individual ship commanders have total autonomy during the chaotic battle that unfolds. This is not a tactical game, it is a strategic one. These gratuitous space battles are not won by plucky heroes with perfect teeth, but by the geeky starship builders who know exactly what ratio of plasma-cannons to engines each ship in the fleet will need.


Pirate Bay closure sparked file-sharing boom

Submitted by: KnightMare @ 03:25 PM | Monday, November 2, 2009 | (url: http://www.pcpro....)

The temporary closure of the Pirate Bay had the unforeseen side effect of forcing torrent sharers underground and causing a 300% increase in sites providing access to copyright files, according to McAfee.

In August, Swedish courts ordered that all traffic be blocked from Pirate Bay, but any hope of scotching the piracy of music, software and films over the web vanished as copycat sites sprung up and the content took on a life of its own.

This was a true 'cloud computing' effort, the company said in its Threats Report for the third quarter. The masses stepped up to make this database of torrents available to others.

Pirate Bay is just a redirect site to lead people to sources where they can get media and other files, McAfee security analyst Greg Day told PC Pro. Once it was temporarily shut down, those people still wanted the torrents so they went elsewhere, and that meant lots of other sites popped up to take advantage we saw a 300% increase in sites hosting and distributing movies and software."

According to Day, in the days prior to the shutdown, treasure-hunters used anonymising software to gain access and copy the indexes that Pirate Bay used to redirect users to other computers hosting torrents.

Once the indexed data was in the public domain, open-source code was available to anyone who wanted to help with redistribution of torrents. While the Pirate Bay was offline there were four times as many sites offering access to the torrents.

The Pirate Bay example shows how difficult it is to 'stop' data once it is on the web, the report says. A website can be shut down, but anyone who has accessed the content may still be able to redistribute it.