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Dweasel
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261 - 06-04-2010, 06:48 PM
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25 to 50 years......
commercialization of "Space, the New Frontier."

Send convicts out there
to do the "nuts and bolts" construction work!
 
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Dweasel
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262 - 06-04-2010, 06:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
I believe the answer to this is Ion Engines. I've read in popsci that using a nuclear power source would give them much more power which in turn boosts thrust.
True that!

Eggi should know something about this ****!
 
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Goshin
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263 - 06-04-2010, 07:15 PM
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totally doable with a Nuclear Lightbulb heavy lifter (1000 tons to LEO, no fissile fuel rain)
called a liberty ship
BRUCE BEHRHORST ARTICLE LIST
Nuclear lightbulb - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
gas core rockets:
Gas core reactor rocket - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

ion thrusters maybe. If we dont want to use our nozzles we have now, we can build things to utilize the immense energy nuclear power grants us.

Read the first link about the liberty ship. It's amazing.

Ion thrusters are good for space, but can't get us into space. Would still need multiple stages and thats what we are trying to get rid of. A single stage to orbit vehicle that can have multiple uses is what is needed to really live in the space age.
 
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arcadus
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264 - 06-05-2010, 02:28 AM
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that liberty ship sounds pretty sweet
 
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LordMelkor
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265 - 06-05-2010, 03:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshin View Post
totally doable with a Nuclear Lightbulb heavy lifter (1000 tons to LEO, no fissile fuel rain)
called a liberty ship
BRUCE BEHRHORST ARTICLE LIST
Nuclear lightbulb - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
gas core rockets:
Gas core reactor rocket - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

ion thrusters maybe. If we dont want to use our nozzles we have now, we can build things to utilize the immense energy nuclear power grants us.

Read the first link about the liberty ship. It's amazing.

Ion thrusters are good for space, but can't get us into space. Would still need multiple stages and thats what we are trying to get rid of. A single stage to orbit vehicle that can have multiple uses is what is needed to really live in the space age.
neat
 
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LordMelkor
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266 - 06-05-2010, 04:49 PM
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Brian Cox: Why we need the explorers | Video on TED.com

The speaker quoted the following at the end of the talk.


Earth, as seen by Voyager 1 at a distance of 4 billion miles (Image from JPL/NASA).

Voyager 1 was about 6.4 billion kilometers (4 billion miles) away, and approximately 32 degrees above the ecliptic plane, when it captured this portrait of our world. Caught in the center of scattered light rays (a result of taking the picture so close to the Sun), Earth appears as a tiny point of light, a crescent only 0.12 pixel in size.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Sagan

Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there--on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known.

Carl Sagan
Pale Blue Dot, 1994
 
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Last edited by LordMelkor; 06-05-2010 at 04:56 PM.
Hive_Tyrant
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267 - 06-05-2010, 06:37 PM
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Carl Sagan, an unintentional poet. RIP Carl.
 
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Mitsubishi
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268 - 06-06-2010, 12:42 AM
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induction catapult
 
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LordMelkor
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269 - 06-06-2010, 12:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitsubishi View Post
induction catapult
Is that like a new term for a rail gun or something...?
 
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Mitsubishi
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270 - 06-06-2010, 12:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordMelkor View Post
Is that like a new term for a rail gun or something...?
No it is a term coined by Heinlein in the mid 60's and still imho the most realistic way we will ever achieve real affordable space travel.
 
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Goshin
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271 - 06-06-2010, 12:50 AM
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uh
i just got sober real fast reading carl sagan
psb spy is making fun of me

fsp
b
 
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LordMelkor
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272 - 06-06-2010, 12:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitsubishi View Post
No it is a term coined by Heinlein in the mid 60's and still imho the most realistic way we will ever achieve real affordable space travel.
The idea of using a catapult for space travel seems a little far fetched... since all the acceleration would have to occur right at the instant of launch resulting in a huge impulse.

If you used something like that get to escape velocity, the resulting forces would probably crush the occupant... doesn't really seem like a viable method for manned travel (and how would you get back, if you were to travel to/land on the moon or something?)

Then again I haven't done/seen any of the calculations on the matter, but I would think that's why people never ended up opting for this method (it's also similar to Verne's "From the Earth to the Moon" concept)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshin View Post
uh
i just got sober real fast reading carl sagan
psb spy is making fun of me

fsp
b
Why are you reading TW if you're out drinking
 
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Last edited by LordMelkor; 06-06-2010 at 01:04 AM.
Mitsubishi
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273 - 06-06-2010, 01:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordMelkor View Post
The idea of using a catapult for space travel seems a little far fetched... since all the acceleration would have to occur right at the instant of launch resulting in a huge impulse.

If you used something like that get to escape velocity, the resulting forces would probably crush the occupant... doesn't really seem like a viable method for manned travel (and how would you get back, if you were to travel to/land on the moon or something?)

Then again I haven't done/seen any of the calculations on the matter, but I would think that's why people never ended up opting for this method (it's also similar to Verne's "From the Earth to the Moon" concept)


Why are you reading TW if you're out drinking

you need one ten miles long to get a ship to mach 3 at 3g's sustained...thirty miles long and its easily escape velocity.
 
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LordMelkor
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274 - 06-06-2010, 03:47 AM
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6-8 minutes at sustained 3Gs seems like a lot
 
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Goshin
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275 - 06-08-2010, 11:47 AM
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are you guys talking about a mag rail gun system?
or a long arm level launcher (catapult system) ?

we can get more into that shortly
here's an update from SpaceX with lots of great information. I need to catch up on my space information. Really busy this week, most likely i can start next monday, and get something of value in here by mid week.

Quote:
SpaceX Achieves Orbital Bullseye With Inaugural Flight of Falcon 9 Rocket
_________________________ _______________
A major win for NASA's plan to use commercial rockets for astronaut transport
Cape Canaveral, Florida--June 7, 2010--SpaceX (Space Exploration Technologies Corp.) announced that the inaugural flight of the Falcon 9 launch vehicle successfully launched and achieved Earth orbit right on target, marking a key milestone for SpaceX and the commercial space flight industry.
Preliminary data indicates that Falcon 9 achieved all of its primary mission objectives, culminating in a nearly perfect insertion of the second stage and Dragon spacecraft qualification unit into the targeted 250 km (155 mi) circular orbit. SpaceX also gathered important aerodynamic data during ascent and vehicle performance, which will be used in final preparations for the upcoming NASA demonstration and missions to the International Space Station (ISS).
"This is a major milestone not only for SpaceX, but the increasingly bright future of space flight," said Elon Musk, CEO and CTO, SpaceX. "It was an incredible day for the employees of SpaceX, but it is important to note that we did not do this alone. I'd like to thank from the bottom of my heart all of our supporters in NASA***8212;particularly the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) office***8212;the US Air Force, the FAA and our customers. Their support has been critical to this success."
SpaceX currently has an extensive and diverse manifest of over 30 contracted missions, including 18 missions to deliver commercial satellites to orbit. In addition, the Falcon 9 launch vehicle and Dragon spacecraft have been contracted by NASA to carry cargo, which includes live plants and animals, to and from the ISS. Both Falcon 9 and Dragon have already been designed to meet NASA's published human rating standards for astronaut transport, allowing for a rapid transition to astronauts within three years of receiving a contract to do so. The critical path item is development and testing of the launch escape system, which would be a significant improvement in safety over the Space Shuttle, which does not possess an escape system.
The NASA COTS program has demonstrated the power of what can be accomplished when you combine private sector responsiveness and ingenuity with the guidance, support and insight of the US government. For less than the cost of the Ares I mobile service tower, SpaceX has developed all the flight hardware for the Falcon 9 orbital rocket, Dragon spacecraft, as well as three launch sites. SpaceX has been profitable for three consecutive years (2007 through 2009) and expects to remain modestly profitable for the foreseeable future. The company has over 1000 employees in California, Texas and Florida, and has been approximately doubling in size every two years. A majority of the future growth is expected to occur in Texas and Florida.
Falcon 9 lifted off at 2:45 p.m. (EDT) / 18:45 (UTC) from Launch Complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station located on the Atlantic coast of Florida, approximately 5.5 km (3.5 mi) southeast of NASA***8217;s space shuttle launch site. The Falcon 9 launch vehicle is powered by a cluster of nine SpaceX-designed and developed Merlin engines. Using ultra pure jet fuel and liquid oxygen, the engines generated nearly a million pounds of thrust for the vehicle upon liftoff. View a high definition liftoff video clip here.
The Merlin engine is one of only two orbit class rocket engines developed in the United States in the last decade (SpaceX's Kestrel is the other), and is the highest efficiency American hydrocarbon engine ever built. The Falcon 9 first stage, with a fully fueled to dry weight ratio of over 20, has the world's best structural efficiency, despite being designed to higher human rated factors of safety.
personally, i'm extremely excited that the launch went as well as it did.
wow.
 
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max
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Old
276 - 06-08-2010, 01:04 PM
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That nuclear lightbulb turns me on. Tell me more about space!
 
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Golazo
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277 - 06-08-2010, 01:10 PM
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f spaceX and its musk
 
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Goshin
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278 - 06-08-2010, 01:12 PM
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dumb post is dumb
what do you want to know max?
 
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Goshin
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279 - 06-16-2010, 02:29 PM
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sorry, work and personal life are stupidly busy
heres an update with SpaceX
BBC News - Next-generation Iridium to launch on SpaceX Falcon 9
~500 million dollar contract through 2017
cool beans
 
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Rampancy
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280 - 06-27-2010, 02:08 PM
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goshin update us please

i love this thread
 
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