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Esteban_Villa
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Old
241 - 04-15-2010, 12:55 PM
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what if we just put a giant magnet into space, and multiple of them? read like the first 4 posts on this page so if this has been suggested already, disregard.
 
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Goshin
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Old
242 - 04-15-2010, 01:09 PM
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you'll need to be more concrete than that...


as for Direct being out, untrue. If commericial is the way forward, the companies that own and built the shuttle have all the blueprints and components necessary to design it without nasa involvement

if thats the way it goes, thats the way it goes
(i think they said it could be done a little faster as well as a little cheaper)
 
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Esteban_Villa
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Old
243 - 04-15-2010, 01:11 PM
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magnets can not be made from concrete
 
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evilbadz
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244 - 04-15-2010, 01:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPNirology View Post
magnets can not be made from concrete
That is not entirely true :]
 
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Old
245 - 04-15-2010, 01:17 PM
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it's amazing how many of my republican friends (all 3 of them) have said this is a sad day for america. i would think they would be happy that we would have smaller government and looking towards free enterprise for innovation.
 
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Esteban_Villa
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246 - 04-15-2010, 01:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilbadz View Post
That is not entirely true :]
do tell more how a concrete could be a magnet as I'm not really aware of how magnetism works and I'm quite interested.
 
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Goshin
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Old
247 - 04-15-2010, 01:30 PM
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space is important
but they may just be finding more reasons to bash a black guy who runs us
 
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evilbadz
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Old
248 - 04-15-2010, 03:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPNirology View Post
do tell more how a concrete could be a magnet as I'm not really aware of how magnetism works and I'm quite interested.
Just like they embed all sorts of aggregates in cement to make concrete (rock, fibers, etc) you can embed magnetite or iron in the cement and have a magnetic block of concrete. I believe someone has already done it for shop walls or something, read it a long time ago.
 
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Swensonator
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249 - 04-15-2010, 04:00 PM
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When deep space exploration ramps up, it'll be the corporations that name everything, the IBM Stellar Sphere, the Microsoft Galaxy, Planet Starbucks.
 
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LordMelkor
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250 - 04-15-2010, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPNirology View Post
what if we just put a giant magnet into space, and multiple of them? read like the first 4 posts on this page so if this has been suggested already, disregard.
Have fun with that, magnetic field lessens by the inverse square law. So it would only be effective over useless distances.
 
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Goshin
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251 - 04-15-2010, 05:06 PM
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obama pretty much says, we'll figure out an HLV by 2015, NEO by 2025, mars in 2035

sigh
hopefully commericial can ramp it up faster
and he's wanting to give more money to robotics (which is good)
and r&d (also good)
 
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LordMelkor
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Old
252 - 04-15-2010, 08:12 PM
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Feud Over NASA Threatens America's Edge in Space
 
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Goshin
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253 - 05-07-2010, 10:44 AM
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Q:Has SpaceX ever done any saltwater immersion tests with a Merlin?

A:This doesn't really answer your question, but attached is a 1962 MSFC report that discusses immersion of H-1 engines in salt water (pp. 12 and following). The Merlin probably uses somewhat different materials and so on, but its specs aren't drastically different from those of the H-1.

Three engines were immersed for several hours and then fired, with differing treatments after being hauled out of the water. One was washed with fresh water, shipped from Florida to MSFC, disassembled, "partially cleaned" and put in storage for 6 months. It was then reassembled and fired.

MSFC estimated that refurbishment cost about 5% as much a new engine.

I imagine a modern engine would be more finicky, but in 1962 at least salt water does not seem to have been too much of a problem.
-----
pretty interesting test
Here's a spacex Update regarding Falcon 9 launches
SpaceX - Updates
lots of good photos too!


more stuff
ttp://www.nasa.gov/pdf/428356main_Exploration.pd f
Quote:
In FY 2011, NASA will initiate several Flagship Technology Demonstrators, each with an expected lifecycle cost in the $400 million to $1 billion range, over a lifetime of five years or less, with the first flying no later than 2014. In pursuit of these goals, international, commercial, and other government agency partners will be actively pursued as integrated team members where appropriate. NASA will not give responsibility for all demonstrations to any single NASA center but rather looks forward to engaging with the expertise of various centers to accomplish these objectives. Specific architecture and approach for missions to demonstrate key capabilities will be developed for initiation in FY2011. Technologies targeted for demonstration will likely include:

...
Lightweight/Inflatable Modules: Inflatable modules can be larger, lighter, and potentially less expensive for future use than the rigid modules currently used by the International Space Station (ISS). Working closely with industry and international partners who have already demonstrated a number of capabilities and interest in this arena, and building on previous ESMD investments, NASA will pursue a demonstration of lightweight/inflatable modules for eventual in-space habitation, transportation, or even surface habitation needs. The demonstration could involve tests of a variety of systems, including closed-loop life support, radiation shielding, thermal control, communications, and interfaces between the module and external systems. Use of the ISS as the testbed for this technology is an option being considered to potentially benefit both programs.

k bai!
 
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Goshin
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Old
254 - 05-18-2010, 07:32 PM
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brought up elsewhere:
why colonize space instead of the oceans. partial sorta rebuttal:

problems with the ocean are the vast vast pressure difference
**** that
instead, lets put a 1 mile long disk (can be assembled from smaller chunks) near the top of the clouds of venus
atmsopheric pressure there is at 1 whatever earth is, so no pressure suits required. Just need a scuba mask
benefits?
the crazy atmosphere below the clouds is dense enough to hold the city aloft, even if you completely built it up. maybe make a big bubble and pump oxygen into the city, or no bubble and everyone has masks
but no propellant needed
you just drift in the green sky
awesome

totally doable with a Nuclear Lightbulb heavy lifter (1000 tons to LEO, no fissile fuel rain)
called a liberty ship
BRUCE BEHRHORST ARTICLE LIST
Nuclear lightbulb - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
gas core rockets:
Gas core reactor rocket - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
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triple
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255 - 05-18-2010, 07:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPNirology View Post
what if we just put a giant magnet into space, and multiple of them? read like the first 4 posts on this page so if this has been suggested already, disregard.
****ing magnets, how do they work?
 
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Goshin
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Old
256 - 05-18-2010, 08:03 PM
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Space, or the Ocean?
Forget space travel***46; The ocean is our final frontier | Frank Pope - Times Online
hindsight helps here since this article was posted...in 2008?
Okay, this person just does not fact check at all then. SO he has no excuses. Lets get cracking

Quote:
Earth is spent, but the Universe awaits. It seems we can't get off the planet fast enough. Two thirds of Nasa's $17 billion annual budget is devoted to manned space exploration, a figure that will swell with President Bush's decision to send a man to Mars in 2037. We've seen all there is to see on Earth, right? Wrong. The final frontier is here. The deep sea remains unconquered even as its edges lap your beach towel.
Bush passed his idea on in 2005. Nasa did not see a budgetary increase and in fact, has only recently received a bump from our current president in the amount of 5-6 billion for R&D and robotics (the more successful ventures)

Quote:
t the very bottom, more than 11km down, lie the Challenger Deeps. Twelve humans have walked on the moon. None has set foot in the Deeps, and only two have seen it with their own eyes.
i'd like to know what 2 people have seen the bottom of the ocean. I didnt think we had anything that could survive the pressure long enough

Quote:
Yet things live down there. Big things. Hydrophone arrays throughout the sea listen for the whisper of enemy submarines and can detect the exact frequency of propeller types. No one has explained the undersea roar that occasionally startles operators. The sound appears biological in origin, and its wavelength implies that it is produced by an animal bigger than a blue whale (the largest creature known on the planet).
here he is talking about Bloop - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. It made noise 11 years prior to his article, and went silent.
True, we dont know what it was, and it may have been organic, but it hasnt surfaced since.

Quote:
A single launch of the Space Shuttle costs $450 million, and buys only the morbid spectacle of astronauts risking death going to fix the already out-of-date International Space Station.
outdated? it's just now finally about to be totally complete and ready for tons of data retrieval. the AMS is ****ing sweet Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

anyway, i get what he's saying. We have something right here we can explore without the cost of space
but he's fundamentally wrong. He ignored the intense pressure and cold humans would encounter exploring the depth of the ocean. Cities under the water? glass would crack from the pressure. He even says the differences in pressure eventually reach 1000 times that of earth on sea level
then he follows up and ends with
Quote:
Manned exploration of space is science fiction. The adventure of the abyss is science fact.
??????????????????
far as i know, we're exploring the solar system and we got off track by shelving nuclear solutions and continuing with the tapped out chemical rocket design.


well, proven wrong on the people hitting the ocean floor. that's pretty sweet
Quote:
When they reached the featureless seabed, they saw a flat fish as well as a new type of shrimp. Marine biologists later disputed their observations, claiming that no fish could survive the 17,000 psi pressure at such depths. Upon discovering cracks in the viewing windows, Piccard cut the voyage short. After only a 20-minute stay on the bottom, they began dumping ballast for their return to the surface, and the damaged vessel returned to its escort ships without incident in three hours and 15 minutes.
20 minute stay though. I agree with idiot journalist that we should up the oceanographic research monies. again, build 10 less fighter jets and double the funding to this endeavor.
Quote:
During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effects of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future manned space-flight missions
very cool and highlighting both agencies and how they can, and should partner with each other, to solve high stress environmental problems.
 
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Goshin
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Old
257 - 06-02-2010, 09:38 AM
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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

SpaceX is now targeting Friday, June 4th for its first test launch attempt of the Falcon 9 launch vehicle.
The primary schedule driver for the first Falcon 9 test launch has been certification of the flight termination system (FTS). The FTS ensures that Air Force Range safety officials can command the destruction of the vehicle should it stray from its designated flight path.
The successful liftoff of the recent GPS satellite launch last Thursday freed up the necessary Range resources to process our final documentation, and we are now looking good for final approval of the FTS by this Friday, June 4th, just in time for our first launch attempt.
Today we completed end to end testing of the Falcon 9 as required by the Air Force Range and everything was nominal. Later this evening, we will finish final system connections for the FTS. Tomorrow we plan to rollout in the morning, and erect the vehicle in the afternoon. On Friday, the targeted schedule is as follows:

Friday 4 June 2010

Launch Window Opens: 11:00 AM Eastern / 8:00 AM Pacific / 1500 UTC
Launch window lasts 4 hours. SpaceX has also reserved a second launch day on Saturday 5 June, with the same hours.

As always, weather will play a significant role in our overall launch schedule. The weather experts at the Cape are giving us a 40% chance of "no go" conditions for both days of our window, citing the potential for cumulus clouds and anvil clouds from thunderstorms.
If the weather cooperates, SpaceX will provide a live webcast of the launch events, presently scheduled to begin 20 minutes prior to the opening of the launch window. Click here to visit our webcast page which will also be accessible from our home page the day of launch.
It's important to note that since this is a test launch, our primary goal is to collect as much data as possible, with success being measured as a percentage of how many flight milestones we are able to complete in this first attempt. It would be a great day if we reach orbital velocity, but still a good day if the first stage functions correctly, even if the second stage malfunctions. It would be a bad day if something happens on the launch pad itself and we're not able to gain any flight data.
If we have a bad day, it will be disappointing, but one launch does not make or break SpaceX as a company, nor commercial spaceflight as an industry. The Atlas rocket only succeeded on its 13th flight, and today it is the most reliable vehicle in the American fleet, with a record better than Shuttle.
Regardless of the outcome, this first launch attempt represents a key milestone for both SpaceX and the commercial spaceflight industry. Keep in mind the launch dates and times are still subject to change, so please check the webcast page above for updates to this schedule. We appreciate your ongoing support and we hope you will tune in on launch day.
essentially, space x is attempting their first falcon 9 launch friday. If it's a no go due to weather, they try again saturday.
Pretty exciting
if it works, bigelow has access to space
 
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arcadus
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Old
258 - 06-04-2010, 04:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Goshin View Post
??????????????????
far as i know, we're exploring the solar system and we got off track by shelving nuclear solutions and continuing with the tapped out chemical rocket design.
what kind of system would use nuclear power? im not sure how that would work
 
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DocHolliday
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Old
259 - 06-04-2010, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by arcadus View Post
what kind of system would use nuclear power? im not sure how that would work
I believe the answer to this is Ion Engines. I've read in popsci that using a nuclear power source would give them much more power which in turn boosts thrust.
 
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brighton
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260 - 06-04-2010, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by arcadus View Post
what kind of system would use nuclear power? im not sure how that would work
Not sure exactly what he was referring to but these are worth checking out:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_thermal_rocket

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project...ar_propulsion)

Project Longshot - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Project Daedalus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


edit: i cant link for ****
 
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Last edited by brighton; 06-04-2010 at 05:14 PM.
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