The Adventures of Clit Dickerson by Brasstax - TribalWar Forums
Click Here to find great hosting deals from Branzone.com


Go Back   TribalWar Forums > TribalWar Community > General Discussion
Reload this Page The Adventures of Clit Dickerson
Page 1 of 2
Thread Tools
Brasstax
VeteranXV
Contributor
Old
1 - 11-05-2016, 17:06
Reply With Quote
Clit looked back and forth before attempting to cross the busy highway. Left-right-left <pause> left-right-left. The back and forth motion distracted clit. Clit was feeling pretty good about himself. He looked back and forth faster and faster until he fell down in pulsating convulsions by the side of the road. All the drivers stared.

To be continued...
 
Brasstax is offline
 
Sponsored Links
Goshin
VeteranXV
Old
2 - 11-05-2016, 17:10
Reply With Quote
r u high
 
Goshin is offline
 
Thingfish
VeteranXV
Contributor
Old
3 - 11-05-2016, 17:30
Reply With Quote
 
Thingfish is offline
 
SeVeReD
VeteranXV
Contributor
Old
4 - 11-05-2016, 17:41
Reply With Quote
thread delivered
 
SeVeReD is online now
 
Brasstax
VeteranXV
Contributor
Old
5 - 11-05-2016, 17:45
Reply With Quote
Clit picked himself up from the dirt and headed off across the plains. Along the way, clit met some friends and they trapped beaver and sold pelts to the Jews. Many of the party caught dysentery and perished. Some came down with scurvy and went north to seek relief from the massive lemon farms located to the south. They perished due to their miscalculation. This rubbed clit the wrong way. But it felt good anyway.

To be continued...
 
Brasstax is offline
 
burtrennalds
VeteranXV
Old
6 - 11-05-2016, 18:06
Reply With Quote
 
burtrennalds is offline
 
GreyGhost
VeteranXV
Old
7 - 11-05-2016, 19:33
Reply With Quote
CAITLYN! NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
 
GreyGhost is offline
 
T-Dawg
VeteranXV
Old
8 - 11-05-2016, 19:59
Reply With Quote
Then Clit came across some purty lady name of Wilma. Wilma Dikfit was her name. And he asked her, "Do ya feel lucky?" Onna count of she was bowl legged and had a raspy voice.

To be continued...
 
T-Dawg is offline
 
Brasstax
VeteranXV
Contributor
Old
9 - 11-05-2016, 23:41
Reply With Quote
Clit and Wilma hit it off. They got into a boat and sailed into Pirate's Gash.

To be continued...
 
Brasstax is offline
 
bam
VeteranXV
Contributor
Old
10 - 11-05-2016, 23:48
Reply With Quote
 
bam is offline
 
Yaason
VeteranXV
Contributor
Old
11 - 11-06-2016, 01:07
Reply With Quote
 
Yaason is online now
 
HaPpY
VeteranXV
Old
12 - 11-06-2016, 01:42
Reply With Quote
dick clitterson flows better for me
 
HaPpY is offline
 
Brasstax
VeteranXV
Contributor
Old
13 - 11-06-2016, 01:04
Reply With Quote
Wilma and Clit sailed deep into Pirate's Gash where they happened upon the Dread Pirate Clitterson. Most people knew him as Richard but his friends called him Dick.

To be continued...
 
Brasstax is offline
 
Hellsfury
VeteranXV
Contributor
Old
14 - 11-06-2016, 01:07
Reply With Quote
Brasstax has been indulging in the Dickens Cider tonight.


Not that I blame him, I enjoy winding down the night with a Dickens Cider.
 
Hellsfury is offline
 
Ascoe
VeteranXV
Old
15 - 11-06-2016, 06:21
Reply With Quote
:whoever's sig:
 
Ascoe is offline
 
Dr Dance
VeteranX
Old
16 - 11-06-2016, 08:04
Reply With Quote
A good story can make or break a presentation, article, or conversation. But why is that? When Buffer co-founder Leo Widrich started to market his product through stories instead of benefits and bullet points, sign-ups went through the roof. Here he shares the science of why storytelling is so uniquely powerful.

In 1748, the British politician and aristocrat John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, spent a lot of his free time playing cards. He greatly enjoyed eating a snack while still keeping one hand free for the cards. So he came up with the idea to eat beef between slices of toast, which would allow him to finally eat and play cards at the same time. Eating his newly invented "sandwich," the name for two slices of bread with meat in between, became one of the most popular meal inventions in the western world.

What's interesting about this is that you are very likely to never forget the story of who invented the sandwich ever again. Or at least, much less likely to do so, if it would have been presented to us in bullet points or other purely information-based form.

For over 27,000 years, since the first cave paintings were discovered, telling stories has been one of our most fundamental communication methods. Recently a good friend of mine gave me an introduction to the power of storytelling, and I wanted to learn more.

Here is the science around storytelling and how we can use it to make better decisions every day:
Our brain on stories: How our brains become more active when we tell stories

We all enjoy a good story, whether it's a novel, a movie, or simply something one of our friends is explaining to us. But why do we feel so much more engaged when we hear a narrative about events?

It's in fact quite simple. If we listen to a powerpoint presentation with boring bullet points, a certain part in the brain gets activated. Scientists call this Broca's area and Wernicke's area. Overall, it hits our language processing parts in the brain, where we decode words into meaning. And that's it, nothing else happens.

When we are being told a story, things change dramatically. Not only are the language processing parts in our brain activated, but any other area in our brain that we would use when experiencing the events of the story are too.

If someone tells us about how delicious certain foods were, our sensory cortex lights up. If it's about motion, our motor cortex gets active:

"Metaphors like "The singer had a velvet voice" and "He had leathery hands" roused the sensory cortex. [***8230;] Then, the brains of participants were scanned as they read sentences like "John grasped the object" and "Pablo kicked the ball." The scans revealed activity in the motor cortex, which coordinates the body's movements."

A story can put your whole brain to work. And yet, it gets better:

When we tell stories to others that have really helped us shape our thinking and way of life, we can have the same effect on them too. The brains of the person telling a story and listening to it can synchronize, says Uri Hasson from Princeton:

"When the woman spoke English, the volunteers understood her story, and their brains synchronized. When she had activity in her insula, an emotional brain region, the listeners did too. When her frontal cortex lit up, so did theirs. By simply telling a story, the woman could plant ideas, thoughts and emotions into the listeners' brains."

Anything you've experienced, you can get others to experience the same. Or at least, get their brain areas that you've activated that way, active too:
Evolution has wired our brains for storytelling***8212;how to make use of it

Now all this is interesting. We know that we can activate our brains better if we listen to stories. The still unanswered question is: Why is that? Why does the format of a story, where events unfold one after the other, have such a profound impact on our learning?

The simple answer is this: We are wired that way. A story, if broken down into the simplest form, is a connection of cause and effect. And that is exactly how we think. We think in narratives all day long, no matter if it is about buying groceries, whether we think about work or our spouse at home. We make up (short) stories in our heads for every action and conversation. In fact, Jeremy Hsu found [that] "personal stories and gossip make up 65% of our conversations."

Now, whenever we hear a story, we want to relate it to one of our existing experiences. That's why metaphors work so well with us. While we are busy searching for a similar experience in our brains, we activate a part called insula, which helps us relate to that same experience of pain, joy, or disgust.
 
Dr Dance is offline
 
KingSobieski
VeteranXV
Old
17 - 11-06-2016, 10:34
Reply With Quote
tl;dr
 
KingSobieski is offline
 
Plasmatic
VeteranXV
Old
18 - 11-06-2016, 10:48
Reply With Quote
Holy **** zoph, way to stall the thread.
 
Plasmatic is offline
 
Nmag
VeteranXV
Old
19 - 11-06-2016, 19:22
Reply With Quote
Dick Clitterson - "How to Row a Boat" (2015)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58yd9DUp8N4
 
Nmag is offline
 
T-Dawg
VeteranXV
Old
20 - 11-06-2016, 19:43
Reply With Quote
After reaching the ubiquitous Pirates Gash, Clit knew he had to find the Little Man in the Boat, for only the Little Man in the Boat could help Wilma reach that place where women only go once or twice their whole lives, and only pretend they've been there with you. Alas, Clit searched and searched but he couldn't find the Little Man in the Boat. He would have to settle for the rear entrance, knowing full well that Wilma, while reluctantly willing, had eaten chili for lunch.

To be continued...

Jake, from State Farm
 
T-Dawg is offline
 
Page 1 of 2
Reply


Go Back   TribalWar Forums > TribalWar Community > General Discussion
Reload this Page The Adventures of Clit Dickerson

Social Website Bullshit


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


AGENT: CCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/) / Y
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:56.