Worst case scenario for tooth decay?

Brontez
01-16-2005, 01:14 AM
Ok so I went out tonight for a few drinks and one of my buddies isn't drinking. We asked him why and he says he went to the dentist and has a massive cavity in his wisdom tooth and is getting it pulled monday.

Anyways, we get to talking about our teeth/childhood/cavities and start comparing to see who has the worst tooth story. So one of the guys told us you can actually DIE from a ****ing cavity.

So I just got home and did a quick Google but didn't find anything for "tooth decay" +death, but since Tribalwardotcom is better than google I thought I'd ask here.

Is this BS tribalwar or can you really die from a cavity?

triple
01-16-2005, 01:15 AM
not really

its possible without treatment, but you would get sick enough to go see a doctor first, but then again you could probably die from a ****ing cough too

Hologram
01-16-2005, 01:15 AM
I guess maybe from complications, if the tooth rotted really bad.
Maybe you could get a gangrene cheek or something and get a bad infection.

Aestis
01-16-2005, 01:16 AM
If it gets infected, you can die. Zhenya had a relative die from that in Russia, so it's definitely possible. They also have far worse dental care (or they did back then)

mmelmo:(
01-16-2005, 01:16 AM
apparently you can have a 16penny nail in your jaw and be perferctly fine
i doubt a cavity could be fatal

Chaoz
01-16-2005, 01:17 AM
If you kept eating and drinking I suppose the bacteria would build up in there and eventually lead to bad stuff.

Ben Dover
01-16-2005, 01:17 AM
Death.

Razster
01-16-2005, 01:18 AM
Only is that **** tard doesn't brush and keep it clean - will it turn into a infection.
Thus = complications and death - But there is a way to treat it before it is too late - Come on! Didn't school teach you anything?

DrSupey
01-16-2005, 07:40 AM
The bacteria that occurs with tooth decay can cause endocarditis.

The bacteria get to the heart through the bloodstream.

Endocarditis is an infection of the inside walls of the heart. The infection can cause damage to the valves in the heart. Valvular diseases can lead to death.

Therefore, from tooth decay YOU CAN DIE

I'd say that is probly the worst case scenario that you were asking for. :)

Darkfire
01-16-2005, 07:43 AM
False teeth, or a set of cool gold ones, but they will cost him.

Wrathchild
01-16-2005, 07:47 AM
The bacteria that occurs with tooth decay can cause endocarditis.

The bacteria get to the heart through the bloodstream.

Endocarditis is an infection of the inside walls of the heart. The infection can cause damage to the valves in the heart. Valvular diseases can lead to death.

Therefore, from tooth decay YOU CAN DIE

I'd say that is probly the worst case scenario that you were asking for. :)

Yup yup.. which is why a) you don't swallow when brushing your teeth, and b) when you're having your teeth cleaned they vacuum out your mouth. You don't want the bacteria that is dislodged getting into your blood, it can be serious.

Nutcracker
01-16-2005, 08:50 AM
actually the percentage of people that die from teeth infections is like 80%

epidemic
01-16-2005, 09:40 AM
actually the percentage of people that die from teeth infections is like 80%


prove it

Drackap
01-16-2005, 09:50 AM
actually the percentage of people that die from teeth infections is like 80%
95% of statistics are made up.

SuperTrap
01-16-2005, 09:59 AM
95% of statistics are made up.

14% of all people know that

apollod
01-16-2005, 10:00 AM
The patient was taken to theatre, within 3 hours of presentation, for removal of the carious teeth and extra-oral drainage.

A fibre-optic awake intubation was performed and intra-venous antibiotics started at induction (500 mg amoxycillin and 500 mg metronidazole both three times a day). Extra-oral incisions were performed and the carious teeth were extracted. No frank pus was located but extra-oral drains were placed. Over the next 2 days his condition significantly improved and he was discharged home.

Two days later the patient reattended. He was pyrexial and had not been taking his antibiotics, as he found it difficult to swallow. Clinically pus was noted escaping from the extra-oral incision. Blood cultures were obtained and found to be positive for Streptococcus intermedius, which was sensitive to penicillin. Intravenous antibiotics were commenced, (benzyl penicillin 600 mg four times a day and metronidazole 500 mg three times a day). Over the next 4 days the extra-oral swelling and swallowing improved and the patient was discharged home, with oral antibiotics and a follow-up appointment arranged for 1 week later. No further contact was made by the patient. However, on the day of the patient's scheduled follow-up appointment, he was unexpectedly brought to the A&E department by emergency ambulance, having suffered at home sudden haemorrhaging from the oral cavity and subsequent respiratory arrest. On admission the patient's haemoglobin was 5.8 x 109g/dl. Initial examination revealed that the haemorrhage was arising deep within the aerodigestive tract and not from the mouth.

Despite extensive resuscitation measures the patient suffered an electromechanical dissociation arrest and died 2 hours later.

At the post-mortem performed there, an abscess cavity was found at the root of the neck which communicated with the operation sites. It involved the subclavian vein and partially destroyed it. The subsequent haemorrhage tracked behind the pleura producing a mass and through the pleura into the pleural cavity producing a massive haemothorax measuring 3,750 ml.

-----

Most acute orofacial infections are of odontogenic origin. The majority of odontogenic infections are self limiting, and may drain spontaneously. However, these infections may drain into the anatomical spaces adjacent to the oral cavity and spread along the contiguous fascial planes, leading to more severe infection. Due to the proximity of the central nervous system and critical respiratory passages, timely efforts are required to establish a patent airway, mechanical debridement and drainage, and appropriate antimicrobial therapy.

----

Odontogenic infections are among the most common infections of the oral cavity. They can be caused by dental caries, deep restorations that approximate the pulp chamber, pulpitis, periapical abscess, periodontitis, periodontal abscess, and pericoronitis. Odontogenic infections may develop into osteoperiostitis of the jaw, osteomyelitis, and deep fascial space infections.

Horatio Balderdash
01-16-2005, 10:06 AM
Not only cavities etc, but just plain old plaque buildup can kill you... if you're old.

Brush Grandma's teeth or she gonna die! (http://www.stopgettingsick.com/template.cfm-7888)

Dr. Ali El-Solh, lead author of the study published in the November issue of the journal Chest, said the findings "indicate that dental plaque is a reservoir of respiratory pathogens" that can be inhaled into the lungs and lead to pneumonia.


I'll take 1 subscription to Chest, please... :)

ICFire
01-16-2005, 10:10 AM
worst case scenario....gums.

haniblecter
01-16-2005, 11:19 AM
An absese (sp?) forms in the area above your mouth when a cavity penetrates to your root, killing it and rotting it away. The absese eventually hits your brain, and you die a painful death.

Look up my "Mind Numbing Pain" thread for details and how much it hurts.


Was the leading cause of death in the medieval/anceit world aparently.

Arcanox
01-16-2005, 11:29 AM
If can infect your brain and they will have to amputate that.