t-88907 MP3 compression & volume? [Flat] - TribalWar Forums

MP3 compression & volume?

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Hydrogen
11-05-2001, 02:13 PM
What is the best compression to make MP3s sound 'CD Quality'? 128? A lot of time my MP3s sound 'tinny' or 'hollow'. I hate that. I have a LOT of space allocated for mp3s, so I want the best sounding files possible.

Also, I have noticed that if I have a playlist with many MP3s, the volume from track to track varies wildly. Although I don't mess with the volume slider at all, some tracks are very loud, while others are very low in volume.

Any suggestions?

El Mariachi
11-05-2001, 02:16 PM
When you rip your songs, you can 'normalize' them to the same general volume.

I don't how to normalized already ripped ones.

Best compression/quality is either 192 or 128. Depending on your preference.

Gon
11-05-2001, 02:17 PM
use eac/lame

r3mix is good settings yo....

Hydrogen
11-05-2001, 02:19 PM
Mar, what compression do you use for best quality? 128 or 192? What is the file size difference.

Good to know about the nomalization. Is it on by default usually? Is there anyway to tell if an mp3 has been 'normalized' before you dl it? Right now I find it very annoying.

Gon
11-05-2001, 02:20 PM
www.r3mix.net

Hydrogen
11-05-2001, 02:21 PM
wow. Great link. thanks.

El Mariachi
11-05-2001, 02:24 PM
Im more of a space hog than a quality buff- so I go with 128. To tell you the truth I don't notice a diff between 128 and 192 but then again I really never tried to notice.

I think 128 rate will make the file about 10% the size of an uncompressed wav file.

MaxDread
11-05-2001, 02:59 PM
If quality is what matters and you don't plan on moving the files to a portable mp3 player, you might as well go with Mpeg Plus (.mpc)

iNVAR
11-05-2001, 03:06 PM
normalizing a WAV before compressing it to MP3 is BAD. quick explanation:

you have a 10 track CD. the first 5 tracks are say... 95% peak volume. your next 5 are say... only 88% peak volume. that's the way the artist wanted it. normalization will bump everything to say... 92% (or whatever you set it to) and that is NOT what it was meant to be. the only time you normalize a WAV before MP3 compression is if you're making a mix MP3 CD to use in your portable or something. if you're doing it for archival purposes, you never normalize.

also, 128 is ****. any one with an ear for listening worth **** can hear the difference, even with crappy speakers. i recommend 192 at least, or the VBR settings from www.r3mix.net at least.

LameENC all the way too. Audiocatalyst sucks ass.

noyeti
05-23-2003, 05:00 PM
http://www.geocities.com/mp3gain/

iNVAR
05-23-2003, 05:01 PM
wow, talk about an mega bump for an ancient post.

Ixiterra
05-23-2003, 05:16 PM
wow, talk about an mega bump for an ancient post.

I was wondering why the r3mix link didn't work. ;)

Vlasic
05-23-2003, 05:40 PM
192? rof

320 VBR encoded with Lame = best quality

Elantrix
08-22-2003, 11:16 PM
Is there anything better to encode MP3's then CDex (http://cdexos.sourceforge.net) using LAME v1.30, engine 3.92 MMX?

ptavv
08-22-2003, 11:25 PM
--alt-preset standard is far better than --r3mix in terms of quality/size ratio

that's why all the hardcore audiophiles at places like www.hydrogenaudio.org (lots of good info there, take a look around) use it (or some use --alt-preset extreme).

normalization does contribute to quality degredation, so normally it isn't done by people who know what they're doing

on a sorta-related note, my creative nomad jukebox zen has an awesome EAX setting that'll normalize on the fly and keep all my mp3s on it playing at the same volume

Hydrogen
08-22-2003, 11:29 PM
.

Baby Bew
08-23-2003, 12:36 AM
wow, talk about an mega bump for an ancient post.
omg It did it again!..This thread...its...ALIVE!!

Xplo
08-23-2003, 12:43 AM
To add some useful information that no one will ever see...

Often, one track will sound louder than another even though they're normalized to roughly the same volume because the louder track has more DYNAMIC RANGE COMPRESSION (which, very simply, makes quiet sounds louder). This is particularly true in the case of something like classical music (which often has no compression, and may have very quiet parts) vs. almost any modern mainstream music intended for radio play (which is usually compressed like mad, to make it as loud as possible so it stands out).

Uncle Silas
08-23-2003, 12:52 AM
VBR. Use it. Love it. Share it.

ptavv
08-23-2003, 12:58 AM
To add some useful information that no one will ever see...

Often, one track will sound louder than another even though they're normalized to roughly the same volume because the louder track has more compression (which, very simply, makes quiet sounds louder). This is particularly true in the case of something like classical music (which often has no compression, and may have very quiet parts) vs. almost any modern mainstream music intended for radio play (which is usually compressed like mad, to make it as loud as possible so it stands out).
compression does not necessarily make music louder but good try