t-51744 OT:Inside theMind of Isaac Asimov [Flat] - TribalWar Forums

OT:Inside theMind of Isaac Asimov

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FngrBANG
06-04-2001, 03:41 PM
For those who don't recognize the name, Asimov was a renowned sci-fi Author and writer in general. He is the guy who devised The Laws of Robotics

I won't argue over the size of Isaac Asimov's intellect, but I can attest to his studious research and meticulous recording of the facts. So, I decided I'd put in a lil' daily installment of some of these facts that Asimov discovered and confirmed. I'll try to stay consistant and provide at least 1 fact per day. Hopefully, folks will find the trivia entertaining. If anyone else wishes to post an interesting fact, do so--just make sure it is confirmed as being fact. As for my posts, they're being taken from, where else, Isaac Asimov's Book of Facts 1979-97(there are over 3k facts in this thing).

Energy--The Earth recieves only one-half of one-billionth of the sun's radiant energy. But in just a few days it gets as much heat and light as could be produced by burning all the oil, coal, and wood on the planet.

Cold Facts--The temperature can become so cold in eastern Siberia that the moisture in a person's breath can freeze in the air and fall to the earth with soft crackling or whispering sounds.

Numbers and Statistics--If the population of the Earth were to continue to increase at the present rate indefinately, by 3530 A.D., the total mass of human flesh and blood would equal the mass of the Earth. By 6826 A.D., the total mass of human flash and blood would equal the mass of the known universe.

Our Body--If 80% of our liver were to be removed, the remaining part would continue to function, and within a few months the liver would have reconstituted itself to its original size.

bandicot
06-04-2001, 04:14 PM
Originally posted by FngrBANG
Numbers and Statistics--If the population of the Earth were to continue to increase at the present rate indefinately, <snip> by 6826 A.D., the total mass of human flash and blood would equal the mass of the known universe.
And the earth would be expanding at almost the speed of light- in flesh.

Good facts. I'll look forward to the daily installment.

Sircle
06-04-2001, 04:24 PM
:huh:

FngrBANG
06-04-2001, 09:55 PM
I think the key phrase here is "Known Universe" dewd...

Medicine--The sugar from the urine of a diabetic is identical with grape sugar. Discovery of this fact by the French chemist Michel Eugene Chevreul, in 1815, was the first step in the direction of recognizing diabetes as a disease of sugar metabolism.

Religion--Queen Mary, in 1555, banned any version of the Bible in English translation, commanding "that no manner of persons presume to bring into this realm any manuscripts, books, paper, etc., in the name of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Miles Coverdale, Erasmus, Tyndale, etc., or any like books containing false doctrines against the Catholic faith."

Religion--No clergymen attended the U.S.Constitutional Convention, and the Constitution itself contains no religious references, not even a mention of God. The Founding Fathers even added these strong words in the Bill of Rights two years later: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof."

Velocity
06-04-2001, 10:52 PM
Originally posted by FngrBANG
Religion--Queen Mary, in 1555, banned any version of the Bible in English translation, commanding "that no manner of persons presume to bring into this realm any manuscripts, books, paper, etc., in the name of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Miles Coverdale, Erasmus, Tyndale, etc., or any like books containing false doctrines against the Catholic faith."

I don't get this one...

Maniacal
06-04-2001, 11:07 PM
id do her.

FngrBANG
06-04-2001, 11:08 PM
Ten years before Henry VIII broke with the Roman Catholic Church and established the Church of England over the issue of his divorce, he wrote a book entitled Assertion of the Seven Sacraments, which attacked Martin Luther's theses and affirmed his loyalty to the pope. The pope granted Henry the title "Defender of the Faith" for having written this scholastic work. The king kept the title after breaking away from Catholicism--as have his successors to this very day.

Does this help? Isaac was just pointing out the irony of "defending the faith" while condemning the religion.

FngrBANG
06-04-2001, 11:09 PM
Man! I must be bored @ werk. Here are some more:

American Indians--A chief of the Omaha Indian tribe, Blackbird, was buried sitting on his favorite horse.

--Navajo Indians are far more numerous today than they were in the past. Also, they occupy, more or less exclusively, far more land.

Ancient Peoples--Excavations at Ur in Iraq show that the Flood recorded in the Bible may have been a flood that occurred along the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in an area about 400 miles long and 100 miles wide. The water rose high enough to submerge whole cities and deposit a layer of clay eight feet deep. To the survivors, it must have seemed that the entire world had been inundated.

--In 8000 B.C.--which was about 500 years after the beginnings of agriculture, northeast of the Tigris River--there may not have been more than 8 million humans on earth. It is a little more than the total number of people who today live in just one city, New York.

Fluid Facts--The Amazon River pushes so much water into the Atlantic that, more than a hundred miles at sea, off the mouth of the river, one can dip fresh water out of the ocean and drink it.

--A scientist at Michigan State University has calculated that the production of a single hen egg requires about 120 gallons of water, a loaf of bread requires 300 gallons, and a pound of beef, 3,500.

Genius--George Washington Carver, whose research on such common crops as the peanut led the South away from its perilous one-crop economy(cotton), was illiterate until the age of twenty.

--Joseph Priestly is immortal in the history of chemistry as the discoverer of oxygen, in 1774. Lost in that glory is the fact that he also discovered soda water and that he gave the name "rubber" to that soft, bouncy stuff because it could be used to rub out pencil marks.

--Albert Einstein's last words will never be known. He spoke them in German, and the attending nurse did not understand German.

--Louis Pasteur, whose work on wine, vinegar, and beer led to pasteurization, had an obsessive fear of dirt and infection. He refused to shake hands, and he carefully wiped plate and glass before dining.

--Albert Einstein was offered the presidency of Israel. He refused the opportunity, having no head, he said, for human problems.

--The story of Newton and the apple is one legend that's true. Newton described it himself. He saw an apple fall from a tree to the ground at a time when the crescent moon was in the evening sky. He pondered on whether the moon was held in the grip of the same force the apple was--the rest is history. However, there is one part of the legend that isn't true. When it fell, the apple did not hit Newton on the head.

--Isaac Newton dropped out of school when he was a teenager, at his mother's behest. She hoped he would become a successful farmer.

--Benjamin Franklin invented the rocking chair. (Makes me wonder about Mel Gipson's Patriot, now)

--When Alfred Nobel's nitroglycerine factory blew up in 1864, killing his brother, the Swedish government refused to allow the factory to be rebuilt. Nobel, who had invented dynamite, came to be looked upon as a mad scientist viciously manufacturing destruction. He fought that reputation all his life, finally winning out posthumously with the establishment of the Nobel Prizes in his will.

--Thomas Edison, though still in possession of his sight, found Braille preferable to visual reading.

K...more tomorrow...:read:

Velocity
06-04-2001, 11:22 PM
Originally posted by FngrBANG
Ten years before Henry VIII broke with the Roman Catholic Church and established the Church of England over the issue of his divorce, he wrote a book entitled Assertion of the Seven Sacraments, which attacked Martin Luther's theses and affirmed his loyalty to the pope. The pope granted Henry the title "Defender of the Faith" for having written this scholastic work. The king kept the title after breaking away from Catholicism--as have his successors to this very day.

Does this help? Isaac was just pointing out the irony of "defending the faith" while condemning the religion.

I'm sorry... I still don't get the one about Queen Mary. Mary was a devout Catholic, and was very anti-Protestant. I think that before Luther, there was no vernacular version of the Bible, only the Latin version (I know this is true for Germany, but I'm not sure about England). So any English translation of the Bible would have been a Protestant translation, since the Catholics still used the Latin version. So Mary was really banning all Protestant versions when she banned any English translations.

If I got my facts wrong, please correct me...

FngrBANG
06-04-2001, 11:31 PM
She also banned every religious book written in english (which was my condemning comment)...making the masses have to listen to Latin during ceremonies, which ,as you know, every poor person speaks. In essence, she ordained that people attend a mass for which they had no idea what was being said. Pretty clever for an aristocrat.

[EDIT]--sorry about the redundant comments in the beginning. I'm sorry if I'm becomming too confusing, it's a typical trait of mine.

FngrBANG
06-05-2001, 08:58 AM
Today's Fact Topic "Misconceptions"

A person's hair cannot turn white overnight because of some terrible tragedy or frightening experience--or for any other reason.

Euclid worked out virtually none of the theoroms of "Euclidean" geometry. He was a collector of other men's works. Hes great virtue was that he arranged in so logical an order the geometrical threorems known in his time that they can scarcely be improved on.

An ordinary TNT bomb involves atomic reactioin, and could be called an atomic bomb. What we call an A-bomb involves nuclear reactions and should be called a nuclear bomb.

Charles Darwin rarely used the term "evolution." It was popularized by the English sociologist Herbert Spencer, who also popularized the phrase "survival of the fittest."

Albert Einstein, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1921, was honored not for his famous theory of relativity published sixteen years earlier, but for his lesser-known work on the photo-electric effect.

The Pilgrims did not build log cabins, nor did they wear black hats with a conical crown and a hatband with a silver buckle.

Most of us learned in school that the Magna Charta was signed in 1215 by King John. But it was not--the monarch could not write his name. He granted the Magna Charta by placing his seal on it.

Everyone in the Middle Ages believed--as Aristotle had--that the heart was the seat of intelligence.

A perpetual-motion machine would violate the laws of thermodynamics. Nobody has succeeded in producing one; nobody ever will.

radio1_mike
06-05-2001, 10:14 AM
Thanks FngrBANG!

Asimov wrote a tremendous amount of non-fiction. Mostly explaining high concepts of mathematics, science, economics, technology and history at an accessible level.

I used to read all of his non-fiction when I was in high school in the early 80's.

I always loved his mathematical extrapolations!


If you love science, and read Asimov and you'll love science more, if you don't love it, you will at least appreciate it.

Pachacutec
06-05-2001, 10:29 AM
regarding perpetual motion, i keep thinking there has to be someway to use the force of gravity to remain in motion.

however even beyond that, i still dont think it qualifies as perpetual motion, 1) being it has a force coming in
2) it doesn't produce more force on output than what was inputted.

FngrBANG
06-05-2001, 04:15 PM
Laws of Thermodynamics

#1 Throughout any transformation the total energy of any system and its environment is neither lost nor gained

#2 In any moving or energy-using system entropy increases (Fr. physicist Nicolas Carnot 1796-1832, during the Industrial Revolution)

*Remember, even removing something like mechanical friction will not account for total conservation of energy.

:read:

Dead Ben
06-05-2001, 04:17 PM
There is actually a book of trivia that Asimov put out...its a pretty big book if I remember correctly. Had all sorts of stuff in it...this where you getting the info?

Velocity
06-05-2001, 04:20 PM
Originally posted by FngrBANG
As for my posts, they're being taken from, where else, Isaac Asimov's Book of Facts 1979-97(there are over 3k facts in this thing).

FngrBANG
06-05-2001, 05:02 PM
Originally posted by Dead Ben
There is actually a book of trivia that Asimov put out...its a pretty big book if I remember correctly. Had all sorts of stuff in it...this where you getting the info?
Yep, the source is quoted in the initial posting...

Sircle
06-05-2001, 08:30 PM
:ftard:

GreasyBoy
06-05-2001, 08:43 PM
:lol: Sircle blew a gasket. :p

Asimov also wrote several books on physics that were combined into a single book called Understanding Physics that is excellent. I believe it's still in publication and a good read if you can find it.

FngrBANG
06-05-2001, 08:47 PM
Innovations--Tired of pounding the pavements all day looking for a job, Humphrey O'Sullivan of Boston sat down one day and invented the rubber heel.

Go, Irish!