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Artificially Intelligent Russian Robot Makes a Run for It Again

Submitted by: Odio @ 01:04 AM | Sunday, June 26, 2016 | (url: http://www.livesc...)

A robot in Russia caused an unusual traffic jam last week after it "escaped" from a research lab, and now, the artificially intelligent bot is making headlines again after it reportedly tried to flee a second time, according to news reports.

Engineers at the Russian lab reprogrammed the intelligent machine, dubbed Promobot IR77, after last week's incident, but the robot recently made a second escape attempt, The Mirror reported.

Last week, the robot made it approximately 160 feet (50 meters) to the street, before it lost power and "partially paralyzed" traffic. [The 6 Strangest Robots Ever Created]

Promobot, the company that designed the robot, announced the escapade in a blog post the next day.

The strange escape has drawn skepticism from some who think it was a promotional stunt, but regardless of whether the incident was planned, the designers seem to be capitalizing on all the attention. The company's blog includes photographs of the robot from multiple angles as it obstructs traffic, and the robot's escape came a week after Promobot announced plans to present the newest model in the company's series, Promobot V3, in the fall.

The company said its engineers were testing a new positioning system that allows the robot to avoid collisions while moving under its own control. But when a gate was left open, the robot wandered into the street and blocked a lane of traffic for about 40 minutes, the blog post states.

The Promobot was designed to interact with people using speech recognition, providing information in the form of an expressive electronic face, prerecorded audio messages and a large screen on its chest. The company has said the robot could be used as a promoter, administrator, tour guide or concierge.

In light of the robot's recent escapes, and citing multiple changes to the robot's artificial intelligence, Promobot co-founder Oleg Kivokurtsev told The Mirror, "I think we might have to dismantle it.

Category: Technology | 5 Comments
Tags: skynet

Robot that Chooses to Inflict Pain Sparks Debate about AI Systems

Submitted by: Odio @ 05:41 PM | Monday, June 20, 2016 | (url: http://interestin...)

A robot built by roboticist Alexander Reben from the University of Berkeley, California has the ability to decide using AI whether or not to inflict pain.

The robot aims to spark a debate on if an AI system can get out of control, reminiscent of the terminator. The robot design is incredibly simple, designed to serve only one purpose; to decide whether or not to inflict pain. The robot was engineered by Alexander Reben of the University of Berkeley and was published in a scientific journal aimed to spark a debate on whether or not artificial intelligent robots can get out of hand if given the opportunity.
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Category: Technology | 21 Comments
Tags: skynet

In Just 3 Days, AI Solves Biology Mystery

Submitted by: Odio @ 05:19 AM | Wednesday, June 15, 2016 | (url: http://futurism.c...)

In just three days, an Artificial intelligence has solved one of biologys biggest mysteries independently- how a sliced up flatworm can regenerate into new organisms.

A group of computer scientists from the University of Maryland programmed a computer to randomly predict how a worms genes formed a regulatory network capable of regeneration, which experts would evaluate afterwards through simulation.

Researcher Michael Levin said that solving how flatworms regenerate, through AI, is not just statistics or number-crunching.
The invention of models to explain what nature is doing is the most creative thing scientists do. This is the heart and soul of the scientific enterprise. None of us could have come up with this model; we (as a field) have failed to do so after over a century of effort, he said.

It is important to note, however, that even if the computer only took three days to create the worm model, it took the scientists several years to put together the program.

Researchers are opening up the use of the worm model to create other scientific models and theories in different areas, including cancer research. But, they said, in order to transfer the computers abilities to other areas, massive databases of scientific experiments would need to be prepared in order to have enough raw material for discoveries to be made.

The study by Daniel Lobo and Michael Levin, Inferring Regulatory Networks from Experimental Morphological Phenotypes, was published on Thursday (4 June) in the journal PLOS.