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Australia to spend over $11mn to eradicate carps by releasing herpes virus into river

Submitted by: Odio @ 10:14 AM | Monday, May 2, 2016 | (url: https://www.rt.co...)

As much as 15 million Australian dollars will be spent on funding the clearing of the Murray-Darling Basin from the countrys worst freshwater feral pest. This will be included into Tuesdays federal budget, Australian authorities said on Sunday.

Interestingly enough, the war on fish is to be waged by an unusual means the water will be contaminated with a special type of herpes, known as koi herpes.

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation scientists have been carrying out various tests for nearly a decade on other animals including chickens, mice, frogs, turtles and water dragons to determine the safety and suitability of the virus in dealing with an excessive carp population.

The virus was proven to be harmless to humans and animals, but it causes kidney failure in carps, attacks their skin and kills the fish after sitting tight in its system for about seven days.

It causes high death rates in common carp and in the ornamental koi carp. No other species of fish, including goldfish, are known to be affected by the virus, CSIRO official website says.

It affects the European carp by attacking their kidneys, their skin, their gills and stopping them breathing effectively, Australian Science Minister Christopher Pyne said, according to ABC news.

They have the virus for a week before they show any symptoms and it suddenly kills them within 24 hours, he added.

Its been calculated that the carp-control program planned to be launched in 2018 will kill 95 percent of the targeted fish over the next 30 years.

The project cant be brought to life right away since it is still to be determined how to deal with dead bodies most effectively. A significant part of the budgeting is to be spent specifically on a clean-up program.

Category: General | 29 Comments
Tags: carp ender herpes

There's hope for Ender yet!

Submitted by: Odio @ 08:21 PM | Monday, March 14, 2016 | (url: http://medicalxpr...)

Today, there is only one class of antiviral medicines against herpesvirusesa family of viruses that cause mononucleosis, herpes, and shingles, among other illnesses - meaning options for treating these infections are limited. If viruses become resistant to these frontline treatments, a growing problem particularly in clinical settings, there are no alternative drugs to serve as backup.
In a search for new drugs to treat viral infections, scientists from the University of Utah School of Medicine found that a medicine routinely used to treat heart failure, spironolactone, has an unexpected ability to block infection by Epstein Barr virus (EBV), a herpesvirus that causes mono and is associated with several human cancers. They find that the drug's antiviral properties stem from its ability to block a key step in viral infection that is common to all herpesviruses. Spironolactone's target is distinct from that of existing drugs, revealing that it could be developed into a new class of anti-herpesvirus drug.
"It's remarkable that a drug we have used safely in the clinic for over 50 years is also an effective EBV inhibitor," says senior author Sankar Swaminathan, M.D., chief of infections disease at University of Utah Health Care and professor of internal medicine. "It goes to show how basic research can reveal things we would never have found otherwise." In collaboration with research assistant professor of internal medicine Dinesh Virma, Ph.D., and Jacob Thompson, he published the study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.