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Very hot drinks 'probably' cause cancer: UN body

Submitted by: Odio @ 05:58 AM | Wednesday, June 15, 2016 | (url: http://medicalxpr...)

Drinking very hot beverages "probably" causes cancer of the oesophagus, the UN's cancer agency said Wednesday, while lifting suspicion from coffee if consumed at "normal serving temperatures".

"These results suggest that drinking very hot beverages is one probable cause of oesophageal cancer and that it is the temperature, rather than the drinks themselves, that appears to be responsible," said Christopher Wild, director of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

The agency reviewed more than 1,000 scientific studies on the possible cancer-causing properties of coffee and the popular South American herbal infusion mate.
Both had been classified as "possibly cancerogenic to humans" since 1991, when the last evaluation was conducted.

Evidence gathered since then suggested that neither drink could be linked to a higher cancer risk, said the agency.
However, there was some evidence that drinking these and other beverages at temperatures above 65 degrees Celsius (150 degrees Fahrenheit)may cause cancer of the gullet.
"Studies in places such as China, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Turkey and South America, where tea or mate is traditionally drunk very hot (at about 70 C) found that the risk of oesophageal cancer increased with the temperature at which the beverage was drunk," said the IARC.

"Drinking very hot beverages at above 65 C was classified as 'probably' carcinogenic to humans."

The studies took into account factors that could have skewed assessment of the cancer risk, such alcohol and tobacco use.


Tailoring nanoparticle designs to target cancer based on tumor pathophysiology

Submitted by: Odio @ 12:47 PM | Sunday, February 21, 2016 | (url: http://www.pnas.o...)

Significance

Nanotechnology is a promising approach for improving cancer diagnosis and treatment with reduced side effects. A key question that has emerged is: What is the ideal nanoparticle size, shape, or surface chemistry for targeting tumors? Here, we show that tumor pathophysiology and volume can significantly impact nanoparticle targeting. This finding presents a paradigm shift in nanomedicine away from identifying and using a universal nanoparticle design for cancer detection and treatment. Rather, our results suggest that future clinicians will be capable of tailoring nanoparticle designs according to the patient's tumor characteristics. This concept of personalized nanomedicine was tested for detection of prostate tumors and was successfully demonstrated to improve nanoparticle targeting by over 50%.



Cancer cells love high fructose corn syrup s

Submitted by: KnightMare @ 07:53 AM | Thursday, August 5, 2010 | (url: http://www.reuter...)

- Pancreatic tumor cells use fructose to divide and proliferate, U.S. researchers said on Monday in a study that challenges the common wisdom that all sugars are the same.

Tumor cells fed both glucose and fructose used the two sugars in two different ways, the team at the University of California Los Angeles found.

They said their finding, published in the journal Cancer Research, may help explain other studies that have linked fructose intake with pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest cancer types.

"These findings show that cancer cells can readily metabolize fructose to increase proliferation," Dr. Anthony Heaney of UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center and colleagues wrote.

Heaney said his team found otherwise. They grew pancreatic cancer cells in lab dishes and fed them both glucose and fructose.

Tumor cells thrive on sugar but they used the fructose to proliferate. "Importantly, fructose and glucose metabolism are quite different," Heaney's team wrote.